This Week on Washington Week: The Russia investigation hits the one-year mark | Washington Week

This Week on Washington Week: The Russia investigation hits the one-year mark

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On this week’s Washington Week:  The Russia investigation hits the one-year mark. What is special counsel Robert Mueller's next move?

President Trump marked the first anniversary of the Mueller investigation with a congratulatory tweet to Americans calling the probe "disgusting, illegal and unwarranted."  Mr. Trump has repeatedly called the investigation a "witch hunt" despite the fact that 19 people have been indicted, one person has been sentenced, and there have been five guilty pleas so far. He's also joining forces with Republican allies in the House to demand that the FBI reveal the identity of a secret intelligence source who reportedly provided information to the Mueller probe about the 2016 Trump campaign.

But the president did get some encouraging news from his personal attorney Rudy Giuliani.  The former New York mayor and prosecutor announced on Fox News that Robert Mueller's team has assured him that they cannot indict a sitting president under Justice Department policy. 

This week the Senate Judiciary Committee investigating election meddling released 2,500 pages of testimony that supports U.S. intelligence agencies assessment that Russia intervened in the 2016 election to hurt candidate Hillary Clinton and help Donald Trump.  Their conclusion is at odds with the Republican members of the House Intelligence Committee who agreed Russian President Vladimir Putin wanted to influence the Clinton campaign but not to help Trump.   The Senate testimony also refocused attention on Donald Trump Jr.’s Trump Tower meeting in 2016 with a Russian lawyer who has ties to the Kremlin.

Robert Costa discusses a year of criminal indictments, guilty pleas, tweetstorms, and the future of the Russia probe with:

Yamiche Alcindor of PBS NewsHour

Devlin Barrett of The Washington Post

Mark Landler of The New York Times

Kelsey Snell of NPR