Related Content: Arab Spring

Gaza’s grim prophecy

Essential Reads

In Arab Spring, Obama Finds a Sharp Test

Essential Reads

President Hosni Mubarak did not even wait for President Obama’s words to be translated before he shot back.

“You don’t understand this part of the world,” the Egyptian leader broke in. “You’re young.”

Post-Arab Spring states: magnets for extremism

Essential Reads

When the Arab awakening swept through the Middle East last year, with waves of democratic protesters swallowing tyrants in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya, no one could confidently predict what kind of political order would emerge from the ruins. Certainly the stability of the old order of autocracies was shattered, hopefully along with their characteristic corruption and stagnation. In the long term, there is still reason to hope for a democratic transformation similar to the one that eventually emerged in Eastern Europe at the end of the Cold War.

PBS NewsHour: Ousted Egyptian Leader Hosni Mubarak on Life Support

Web content

There were conflicting reports tonight about the health of critically ill former Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak. Gwen Ifill talks to Nancy Youssef of McClatchy Newspapers in Cairo, who says the ousted president is in a "critical state."

Egyptian Court Rulings Seen as Reversal of Last Year’s ‘Revolution’

Essential Reads

With a pair of court rulings, forces aligned with fallen former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak succeeded Thursday in reversing many of what had been considered democratic gains that have taken place here in the 16 months since Mubarak was toppled from power. Critics denounced the developments as the equivalent of a coup.

The Backstory: Obama's Wars

Web content

What is the Obama doctrine? Coming into office facing two wars, President Obama has embraced covert programs and new technologies that allow his administration to wage secret wars. Get "The Backstory" from David Sanger, The New York Times, on the secret cyber-war the U.S. and Israel are waging against Iran, how the president handled the Arab Spring and how Obama’s foreign policy has changed.

One Thing Certain as Egyptians Vote for President: The Outcome Will be a Surprise

Essential Reads

In an historic first, Egyptians voted Wednesday for their next president, choosing from an array of competing candidates whose wildly divergent campaign platforms pledged everything from revolutionary, religion-based change to a return to the stability of the Hosni Mubarak-era, which came to an end with Mubarak’s ouster last year.

Regime Changes May Lead To Dangerous New Year

On The Radar

Big changes in 2011 — from the Arab Spring to the death of North Korea's dictator — create opportunities for 2012. But change can be scary, even when the regimes to be replaced are unpopular or repressive, because there's never a guarantee the new regime will be better.
Listen to Story

Oops! That Was the Year that Wasn't

On The Radar

A year ago, soon after the Tunisian uprising, I demonstrated my powers of prediction in a column about the democracy movement in the Arab world. The revolution in Tunisia, I wrote, "arose from local circumstances that don't foretell what will happen anywhere else." Three weeks later, Egypt's Hosni Mubarak fell, and the Arab Spring was in full bloom. This brings me to the subject of today's column: A confession of my year's errors and omissions (along with a mention of one or two things I got right).

PBS NewsHour: Could Arab League's Monitoring Efforts Help End Bloodshed in Syria?

Web content

Arab League peace monitors arrived Tuesday in Syria's embattled city of Homs, where up to 70,000 protesters turned out. Gwen Ifill discusses international efforts to end the country's bloodshed with Matt Bradley of The Wall Street Journal.