Related Content: Asia

April 25, 2014

Weekly Show

Obama's four-nation tour of Asia, Israel's decision to suspend Mid-East peace talks, the SCOTUS decision to uphold Michigan’s affirmative action ban at public universities, the Justice Dept.'s effort to make select prisoners eligible for presidential clemency grants. Joining Gwen: Indira Lakshmanan, Bloomberg News; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times; Carrie Johnson, NPR; Joan Biskupic, Reuters.

 

April 18, 2014

Weekly Show

The high-level talks between the U.S., Russia, Ukraine and the E.U. to find a diplomatic solution in Ukraine, President Obama defends the healthcare law, the surge in political fundraising and a closer look at the two ongoing investigations into domestic terrorism. Joining Gwen: Peter Baker, The New York Times; Molly Ball, The Atlantic; Matea Gold, Washington Post; Pete Williams, NBC News.

January 3, 2014

Weekly Show

We look ahead to the priorities and challenges facing the Obama administration and Congress in 2014 following a year when partisan gridlock produced more challenges and setbacks than legislative progress. Joining John Harwood of CNBC/The New York Times: Alexis Simendinger, RealClearPolitics; Jeff Zeleny, ABC News; Amy Walter, Cook Political Report; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times.

Hoekstra Super Bowl Ad Draws Criticism

On The Radar

Former Republican Rep. Pete Hoekstra, who’s hoping to unseat Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow in Michigan, is facing criticism for 30-second ad that aired in Michigan during the Super Bowl and features an Asian woman speaking broken English. In the ad, the woman rides a bike through rice paddies as Asian-sounding music plays in the background.
Read More

Some Worry 'New' U.S. Military Focus on Asia is a Muddle

On The Radar

The Obama administration pledge to shift American military strategy toward Asia overlooks a key fact: The United States never really dropped its focus on the region. But the current budget proposal that might flow from that pledge contains a potentially crippling contradiction: The plan might cut the big-ticket items the United States needs to increase its presence in Asia and counter China's growing military capability.
Read More

PBS NewsHour: Could U.S. 'Start Fresh' With North Korea's New Leader?

Web content

Mourners in North Korea said goodbye to Kim Jong-il Wednesday. The funeral procession, led by Kim's designated successor, signified the end of an era for an isolated nation. Gwen Ifill discusses how the leadership change could affect U.S. policy with Donald Gregg of The Korea Society and Georgetown University's Balbina Hwang.

China Reportedly Hacked Chamber Of Commerce

On The Radar

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that hackers in China broke into computers at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, potentially accessing information about its operations and members. NPR's Tom Gjelten talks with Robert Siegel on what, if anything, the hackers could have accessed.
Listen to Story on NPR

Chinese Hack Into US Chamber of Commerce, Authorities Say

On The Radar

For more than a year, hackers with ties to the Chinese military have been eavesdropping on U.S. Chamber of Commerce officials involved in Asia affairs, authorities say. The hackers had access to everything in Chamber computers, including, potentially, the entire U.S. trade policy playbook.
Read More

Kim Jong-il, North Korean Dictator, Dies

On The Radar

Kim Jong-il, the North Korean leader who realized his family’s dream of turning his starving, isolated country into a nuclear-weapons power even as it sank further into despotism, died on Saturday of a heart attack while traveling on his train, according to an announcement Monday by the country’s state-run media. Word of Kim’s death sent shock waves through North Korea’s Asia neighbors and reverberated around the world, reflecting the unpredictable outcome of an abrupt leadership change in one of the most opaque and repressive countries.

On the Radar: March 12, 2010

Legacy: On The Radar