Related Content: Beth Reinhard

Why 2012 Is Reality TV at Nightfall, Not Morning in America

Essential Reads

Two handsome presidential candidates have been displaced by hard-knock folks with unkempt beards and furrowed foreheads. These surrogates wear hooded sweatshirts and baseball caps. They gaze mournfully at vacant lots, chain-link fences, and snowy graveyards. This is not “Morning in America;" this is reality TV at nightfall.

Will Toxic GOP Governors Infect Romney?

Essential Reads

Florida Gov. Rick Scott didn't endorse Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney until last month, after rival Rick Santorum dropped out. It was a tardy and lackluster show of support. "Mitt Romney will be our party's nominee, and it is critical that all Republicans coalesce," Scott said in a written statement, as if forced to acknowledge the inevitable, like it or not. The two former corporate executives, who could probably spend all day swapping success stories, have never campaigned together.

While Obama Dominates Foreign Policy, Romney Sticks to Economy

Essential Reads

Mitt Romney had a tough act to follow. The Republican presidential contender was stumping in the Virginia 'burbs on Wednesday, just hours after President Obama basked in the glory of a prime-time, nationally televised victory speech from an Afghanistan war zone. The contrast was one of the first of what will be many reminders in the 2012 campaign of the disadvantages of running against a sitting president.

Setting the Record Straight on Rubio's Am Ex

Essential Reads

Even if Florida Sen. Marco Rubio isn't getting vetted by the Mitt Romney campaign (yet) as a potential running mate, he is enduring an unusual amount of grilling. On Monday, he acknowledged in an interview with Fox News (around 16:20) that it was "a mistake'' when he was a state lawmaker to use an American Express card paid for by the Republican Party of Florida to pick up thousands of dollars in personal expenses.

Victory on Arizona Immigration Law Could Cost Republicans in the Long Run

Essential Reads

If the Supreme Court rejects the Obama administration’s challenge to the Arizona immigration law, the ruling would be widely viewed as a victory for the Republican Party, whose leadership spearheaded the law in the state and championed its spirit nationwide. But at what cost?

April 13, 2012

Weekly Show

With Rick Santorum out of the GOP race, Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama are gearing up for the general election. But recent comments about Romney's wife, Ann, have caused controversy over gender politics. Plus, a look at the fragile ceasefire in Syria. Joining Gwen: Dan Balz, Washington Post; Beth Reinhard, National Journal; John Harris, POLITICO; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times.

 

Ann Romney Tweets; What Would Hillary Do?

On The Radar

You've come a long way, baby? Somehow the 2012 campaign has regressed back to 1992 (some would say even decades earlier) when Hillary Clinton kicked up a storm for saying "I suppose I could have stayed home and baked cookies and had teas but what I decided to do was to fulfill my profession which I entered before my husband was in public life.''
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Labor Pains

On The Radar

Mitt Romney should be good to go, ready to pivot toward the general election—and there would be no better place to start than Tuesday’s primary in Wisconsin. The state hasn’t voted for a Republican nominee since Ronald Reagan, but close elections in 2000 and 2004 branded it a battleground. Two years after President Obama solidly won the state with 56 percent of the vote, Republicans staged a comeback by winning the Governor’s Mansion, a Senate seat, and two House seats. In Wisconsin, moderates—and cheese-heads—rule.

Romney Needs the Little Guy, Not Another Big Fish

On The Radar

Former Gov. Jeb Bush's endorsement of Mitt Romney on Tuesday, which sent the message that it's time for Republicans to rally behind their likely nominee, also raised a question: Who's next? Speculation immediately centered on South Carolina Sen. Jim DeMint, one of the most popular leaders in the conservative movement, when word leaked Wednesday that he was meeting with Romney on Capitol Hill.
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Republicans Want Romney to Close the Deal

On The Radar

Hoisting his newest trophies — a landslide win in Illinois and an endorsement from former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush — Mitt Romney came to this Baltimore suburb on Wednesday for a victory lap aimed at bringing the marathon Republican primary to a close. The rout in the Midwest, followed hours later by the blessing from one of the GOP’s most respected figures, amplified calls by the Romney campaign and its allies for his flagging rivals to bow out.