Related Content: Egypt

Regime Changes May Lead To Dangerous New Year

On The Radar

Big changes in 2011 — from the Arab Spring to the death of North Korea's dictator — create opportunities for 2012. But change can be scary, even when the regimes to be replaced are unpopular or repressive, because there's never a guarantee the new regime will be better.
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Oops! That Was the Year that Wasn't

On The Radar

A year ago, soon after the Tunisian uprising, I demonstrated my powers of prediction in a column about the democracy movement in the Arab world. The revolution in Tunisia, I wrote, "arose from local circumstances that don't foretell what will happen anywhere else." Three weeks later, Egypt's Hosni Mubarak fell, and the Arab Spring was in full bloom. This brings me to the subject of today's column: A confession of my year's errors and omissions (along with a mention of one or two things I got right).

Justice League

On The Radar

The Arab League, an unwieldy 22-nation conglomerate of autocrats and monarchs, has long been the object of scorn. Established in Cairo in 1945 by a half-dozen Arab countries, it was known—if known at all—for its incompetence and hostility toward Israel. The league declared war on the Jewish state in 1948, froze out companies that did business with Israel, and expelled Egypt after it signed the Camp David peace accords.

McManus: Mosque and State

On The Radar

At a conference two years ago, I sat in on a meeting between U.S. officials and young Islamist politicians from Tunisia, Jordan and other countries in the Middle East. The Islamists wanted to know: Would the Americans allow them to run in free elections, even if it meant they might come to power? The Americans turned the question back at them: Would the Islamists, if they won, allow free and democratic elections, even if it might mean losing power?

Rocks and Hard Places

Gwen's Take

Why Governing Is So Hard

Every four years as I set off to cover another Presidential election cycle, I secretly ask myself: why do any of these people want to be President?

February 18, 2011

Weekly Show

Spreading unrest in Bahrain causes a military crackdown while tensions in Yemen and Iran flair up. The Obama administration urges democratic reform while trying to protect strategic relationships.  At home, Republicans and Democrats fight over federal budget priorities.  Gwen is joined by Doyle McManus, LA Times; Jim Sciutto, ABC News; Jeanne Cummings, POLITICO; and John Dickerson, Slate/CBS News.
 

On the Radar: February 16, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

On The Radar: February 14, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

February 11, 2011

Weekly Show

After three weeks of mostly peaceful protests, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has resigned.  What is next for Egypt?  Reporting on this historic day, Tom Gjelten, NPR, and Yochi Dreazen, National Journal.  In the US, President Obama courts big business & the GOP leadership, plus the first Republican cattle call of 2012 with John Harwood, CNBC/New York Times and Dan Balz, Washington Post.
 

Sending Signals

Gwen's Take

When it Matters and When It Doesn’t

House Speaker John Boehner and Majority Leader Eric Cantor strolled out onto the White House lawn after lunch with the President this week to deliver an upbeat and focused message to the reporters gathered there.

“I thought it was pretty clear today that the President wants to try to find some common ground with us,” Boehner said.

“The economy so desperately needs us to work together,” Cantor added, “to send a signal that we should start growing again as America.”