Related Content: Election 2012

Ohio's deluge of spin

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Be glad you don't live in Ohio. It's a fine old state with pretty towns, friendly people and a fairly healthy economy. But over the last six months, its citizens have endured a volume of political advertising unequaled in the history of Western civilization.

Voice of the Voters: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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The once solidly red North Carolina narrowly turned blue in 2008 to help Barack Obama win the White House. Two years later the state reverted to red with a wave of GOP wins in the 2010 midterm election. So in this tight 2012 election will Barack Obama or Mitt Romney win this swing state's 15 electoral votes? Journalism students Averi Harper and Alex Giles of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill report on the issues driving North Carolinian voters to the polls this year.

 

In middle of a messy election, a nightmare makes landfall

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In the dark of night, when they get what little sleep they get these days, the people running the campaigns for president have more than enough fodder for nightmares. Worse, come daybreak, they realize their worst fears may yet come true.

Will Sandy add another twist to tight race?

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President Obama, plowing into the final week of what he calls his last campaign, cannot realistically gauge how Hurricane Sandy might change his fortunes in a election so close it could shift in a breeze, let alone a gale.

Ohio, the Bull’s-eye State: Obama, Romney aim full arsenals at vital electoral prize

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Kathy Wade was out mowing her lawn on a raw and rainy Friday when Doyle and Jane Peyton, volunteer canvassers for Mitt Romney’s campaign, stopped at the curb in her suburban neighborhood 20 miles from Columbus. Doyle asked her: Had she decided how she would vote in the presidential election?

Romney hides positions from U.S. voters, Plouffe says

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White House senior adviser David Plouffe said Republican Mitt Romney is “disingenuously” hiding his positions from voters as polls show the U.S. presidential contest deadlocked in the campaign’s final days.

October 26, 2012

Weekly Show

With less than two weeks to go, the roundtable takes a look at the candidates’ swing-state campaign sprint. Also, we analyze the foreign policy plans of both candidates after the final debate. Plus, we examine the battle for Senate control which rests in the hands of a few states.  Joining Gwen:  James Kitfield, National Journal; Gloria Borger, CNN; Molly Ball, The Atlantic; Susan Davis, USA Today.

On a frenetic day, Obama votes and Romney is for change

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Mitt Romney adopted the mantra that fueled his opponent’s victory four year ago, casting himself as the candidate of “big change” on Thursday in Ohio as he began to outline a closing argument in the state that could decide the race.

How to deploy your candidate

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As the presidential election heads into its final days, the most important decision strategists in both campaigns are making is where to send the candidate. There is no more precious resource: Every visit initiates a multilevel strategy to capture votes, voter information, and volunteers who can be squeezed for one more hour of effort.

Touting momentum, Romney tries to look like a winner

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He does it too often to be a slip of the tongue. When Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney addresses his growing crowds, he always catches himself.

"If I'm president - when, I'm president," Romney says in his speeches now, drawing cheers from the crowd.