Related Content: Election 2012

The Politics of Israel: Campaign 2012

On The Radar

In American presidential politics, wrapping yourself in the Israeli flag is a no-brainer. Stalwart support for Israel is important for many American-Jewish voters, an important source of campaign donations, and a potential swing vote in key battleground states such as Florida, Pennsylvania, and Ohio. Fealty to Israel plays well with evangelical Christians who back the Jewish state largely out of theology, and who can make the difference in early-voting states like Iowa and South Carolina. Strong backing of Israel is viewed as a litmus test for powerful lobby groups in Washington.

Newt by Proxy

On The Radar

In 1995, then-House Speaker Newt Gingrich banned proxy votes in committees. That meant no longer could powerful chairmen (for 40 years previous, all Democrats) cast votes for lawmakers who skipped out on the marking-up of legislation. This is ironic because the reason Gingrich is the Republican presidential front-runner today is that several big-name Republicans essentially cast their proxy vote for him.

Allies Urge Romney to Mix it up More in Campaign

On The Radar

Mitt Romney's above-the-fray campaign style kept him atop the Republican presidential field for months. But it's raising concerns now that Newt Gingrich has moved up to challenge him.

Gingrich Emerges as Clear Front-Runner in Iowa

On The Radar

Propelled by his debate performances and the demise of Herman Cain’s candidacy, former House speaker Newt Gingrich sits atop the Republican presidential field in Iowa with a clear lead over his closest competitors, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll. Gingrich, according to the survey, has advantages that extend well beyond the horse race that put him in an enviable position in the final weeks before the state’s Jan. 3 caucuses, which serve as the formal start of the long nominating season.

More Like Reagan?

On The Radar

Conservatives prize constancy above all else, but if Republicans are really faced with a choice between Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney, this will be a nomination defined by reversals. Nominating Gingrich will require conservatives to embrace a sweeping ideological reversal. Nominating Romney will require Republicans to embrace a candidate who is defined by personal reversals.
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Watching TV in Iowa

On The Radar

For an interesting study in contrasts, compare the television advertising broadcast by the leading Republican presidential candidates ads in Iowa. The most distinctive quality of Newt Gingrich's first ad is its speed: slow motion. Going for the heartstrings, the spot showcases amber waves of grain to purple mountain majesties, joining the scores of homages to Ronald Reagan's beloved "It's morning again in America'' ad. Gingrich says, "Some people say the America we know and love is a thing of the past. I don't believe that.

Newt's Popularity Surges

On The Radar

Newt Gingrich would be a target-rich environment for Democrats, says CNBC's John Harwood.

 

Gingrich Has Strong Lead over Romney in South Carolina

On The Radar

Newt Gingrich has a commanding lead over Mitt Romney in South Carolina, according to a new poll, results that come as the former Georgia Congressman has gained momentum in other key early states. The Winthrop University poll results, based on interviews with more than 1,000 registered voters in the Palmetto state, show Gingrich grabbing 38 percent of the vote and Mitt Romney lagging by double digits at 22 percent.

Will Cain Endorse Gingrich?

On The Radar

With Herman Cain out of the race for the GOP nomination, pundits and politicos are turning their attention to which of his former competitors the plain-spoken former pizza executive might endorse. Speculation is focused on Newt Gingrich, who like Cain hails from Georgia and who was the most effusive of all the Republican hopefuls in praising Cain after the announcement Saturday that he was suspending his campaign.

What's the Next Move for Presidential Candidates?

On The Radar

CBS political correspondents and Politico's chief White House correspondent Mike Allen join Bob Schieffer for a discussion about the current campaign situation, where each candidate is standing, and the course ahead.