Related Content: Election 2012

On the Radar: September 23, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

House Republicans Regrouping on CR, Pondering Two Options
By Susan Davis and Major Garrett, National Journal
House Republicans will meet on Thursday afternoon to discuss their options to move forward on a short-term bill to fund the federal government that their party failed to pass a day earlier. Read more

Boehner Reckons With GOP Revolt
By Naftali Bendavid and Janet Hook, Wall Street Journal
House Speaker John Boehner took power in January promising a freewheeling and open style, rejecting the iron-fisted tactics used by earlier speakers. The embarrassing defeat of a routine spending bill this week that must be passed to avoid a government shutdown brought home the cost of his approach. Read more

Analysis: Perry, Romney defend records in forum
By Charles Babington, Associated Press
Rick Perry and Mitt Romney struggled with a simple reality in the latest GOP debate: Americans elect only experienced politicians as president, and Republicans nominate only proven conservatives. Read More

Pity the 'Super Committee'
By Doyle McManus, Los Angles Times
Pity the poor "super committee." Congress' special task force on the deficit already had a mission that looked nearly impossible: producing a plan to reduce the federal government's fiscal gap by $1.2 trillion over 10 years. And then the job got harder. Read more

The Trojan Horse?
By Yochi Dreazen, National Journal
Tens of thousands of followers of influential Shiite cleric Moktada al-Sadr flooded the streets of Baghdad, Najaf, and Basra last week for some of the largest public rallies in several years. At one point, they might have been demonstrating—even fighting—against the United States as part of the Sadr-led uprising that made the young man’s name. But these protests weren’t about the U.S. presence. Instead, they focused on a different target: the government of Iraq itself. Read more

Rick Perry, Mitt Romney spar in Republican presidental debate
By Dan Balz and Perry Bacon Jr., Washington Post
Texas Gov. Rick Perry and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney tangled over Social Security, health care and other issues here Thursday in a debate in which the Republican presidential candidates sharply criticized the policies of President Obama and joined in an assault on the federal government. Read more

Rick Rolled
By John Dickerson, Slate
The Republican presidential debate in Orlando was sponsored by Google, but it was Gov. Rick Perry who was searching. The frontrunner's answers meandered. When fielding a hypothetical question about terrorists getting nukes in Pakistan, his response ribboned out like he was reading the first search results to come up. Even when he read his attack lines on rival Mitt Romney from the notes on his lectern, it was muddy. This was Perry's third debate this campaign; with each successive one, his performance gets worse. Read more

Perry and Romney Come Out Swinging at Each Other in G.O.P. Debate
By Jim Rutenberg and Jeff Zeleny, The New York Times
In their third debate in as many weeks, former Gov. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts and Gov. Rick Perry of Texas engaged in a sometimes heated back and forth over immigration, health care and entitlements, their rivalry dominating a stage that included seven other candidates struggling to catch up in the race for the Republican presidential nomination. Read more

Advantage, Romney?
By Beth Reinhard, National Journal
More pivotal to the outcome of the GOP presidential race than Rick Perry’s position on Social Security or Mitt Romney’s record on health care reform may be a procedural matter imperceptible to most voters—the 2012 primary calendar. Read more

Mullen: Pakistan’s Spy Agency Supported Attacks on Americans
By Martha Raddatz, ABC News
Before today, never has a U.S. official so bluntly and publicly linked the government of Pakistan to attacks on American troops in Afghanistan. Today on the Hill, Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Mike Mullen said Pakistan’s intelligence agency Inter-Services Intelligence Agency [ISI] supported a group of terrorists who carried out two recent attacks on U.S. targets in Afghanistan, becoming the first U.S. official to so directly accuse Pakistan of supporting terrorism against the U.S. Read more

Three Leaders and the Third Rail of Foreign Affairs
By James Kitfield, National Journal
There are reasons why the Israeli-Palestinian conflict remains among the most enduring in international affairs, and many of them were on display this week as world leaders gathered at the United Nations to contemplate a vote on Palestinian statehood. The three key players arrived in New York already boxed in by their personal histories of distrust, and by powerful domestic constituencies. Read more

 

Searching for Bottom: Why Everybody Had A Bad Week

Gwen's Take

"I went to sleep with gum in my mouth and now there's gum in my hair and when I got out of bed this morning I tripped on the skateboard and by mistake I dropped my sweater in the sink while the water was running and I could tell it was going to be a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day." -- Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst

By now it is old news that the President of the United States is in a deep political hole, with daylight growing ever farther away. He doesn’t have gum in his hair yet, but it’s doubtful the White House would admit it if he did.

On the Radar: September 6, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

Split-Screen: The Art of Watching Two Things At Once

Gwen's Take

Not long ago, I was at the army installation at Fort Bragg, North Carolina reporting a story for the PBS NewsHour when my cellphone began to vibrate with news of a big earthquake back home in Washington, D.C.

We’d felt nothing. I’d been in the moment, interviewing a weeping 26-year-old widow about losing her husband in combat in Afghanistan. My life as split-screen.

On the Radar: September 1, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

On the Radar: August 31, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar