Related Content: Government Shutdown

Bipartisan Deals Can Only Pass Inside a Narrow Window. Here Are the Dates.

Essential Reads

While Congress now seems entirely at the mercy of its own internal dysfunction, there will come a time next year when, in theory at least, House Republicans will be in the best position to vote on divisive issues such as immigration or maybe even a long-term budget deal.

Government shutdown: Plenty of lessons to go around

Essential Reads

Obama and the Democrats won; Republicans and the tea party lost. And both sides are gearing up for next time. Now that our recent brush with financial crisis is behind us, it's time to start planning for the next one.

Americans Felt Betrayed by the Shutdown

Essential Reads

Could Americans really get any angrier at Washington? Even before the recent government shutdown, congressional approval hovered around 10 percent, a minority thought the country was on the right track, and a “throw the bums out” mentality was rampant. Railing against the toxic mess in D.C. has been a winning strategy for politicians from Barack Obama on down for years now.

Iowa Rep. Steve King Upset with Boehner

On The Radar

Iowa GOP Rep. Steve King is frustrated. A day after the conservative lawmaker opted against endorsing any of the Republican Party's presidential contenders competing in tonight's caucuses, he vented further about the party's leadership in Congress. King expressed "real clear frustration" with the leadership of House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, for two offenses in 2011: ruling out the possibility of a government shutdown during the budget debate in the spring, and ruling out a U.S. default during the debt ceiling debate in the summer.

December 16, 2011

Weekly Show

Congress fights the clock to avert a government shutdown. Also, now that the last GOP presidential debate before the Iowa caucus is over, who is the frontrunner? Plus, the war in Iraq officially ends as the U.S. hands over military control to Iraqis. Joining Gwen: Jeanne Cummings, Bloomberg News; Dan Balz, The Washington Post; Jeff Zeleny, The New York Times; Laura Meckler, The Wall Street Journal

 

Congress Reaches Deal to Avoid Government Shutdown

On The Radar

Congress has reached an agreement to fund the federal government through Sept. 30 of next year — avoiding a government shutdown at midnight Friday — and was considering a deal for a short-term extension of a payroll tax cut and unemployment benefits to American workers. While a final deal on the payroll package continued to elude negotiators on Thursday, congressional leaders struck a less partisan tone than in days before and expressed optimism that a deal could be reached.

Big Baby

On The Radar

Forget Newt Gingrich’s $1.6 to $1.8 million in consulting fees from Freddie Mac and his up-to-$500,000 line of credit at Tiffany & Co. Overlook the Greek cruise and the mass campaign-staff exodus. Pay no attention to his two messy divorces and his impeachment of a president over an extramarital affair while he was conducting an affair of his own. But, please, don’t forget the pacifier.

December 22, 1995

Weekly Show

The 1995 budget talks between President Bill Clinton and the Republican-controlled Congress over how to reduce America’s spiraling deficit ended in political deadlock and a partial government shutdown. Republicans were demanding deep cuts in taxes and spending including Medicare; President Clinton wanted smaller cuts in spending and none at all in taxes. Sound familiar?

Grand Bargains: Why they are so elusive

Gwen's Take

I’ve been afflicted this week with a disorienting sense of déjà vu that affects any reporter who has covered Washington long enough. Even the most consequential and operatic standoffs begin to seem eerily familiar.

April 8, 2011

Weekly Show

With a $39 billion spending cut agreed upon, the possibility of a government shutdown is finally over.  The panel discusses why leaders of neither side wanted a shutdown in the first place, and how their constituents may feel. Joining Gwen Ifill: John Dickerson, Slate Magazine/CBS News; Michael Duffy, TIME Magazine; and Jeanne Cummings, Politico.