Related Content: health reform

Health-Care Law Will Add $340 Billion to Deficit, New Study Finds

On The Radar

President Obama’s landmark health-care initiative, long touted as a means to control costs, will actually add more than $340 billion to the nation’s budget woes over the next decade, according to a new study by a Republican member of the board that oversees Medicare financing.
Read More

Justice Kagan--Giving Liberals a Rhetorical Lift

On The Radar

During three days of arguments over the Obama healthcare plan, Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan put on a display of rhetorical firepower, reinforcing predictions that the newest liberal justice is best equipped to take on the conservative, five-man majority controlling the bench.
Read More

Tea Leaf Reading at Its Best: Eavesdropping on the Supreme Court

Gwen's Take

Updated 3/30/12 12:24pm

I was never tempted to go to law school. But I love to parse language and reasoning, so listening to the audio of this week’s Supreme Court health care arguments was -- in its nerdy way -- actually quite enjoyable.

Because the courts remain the only branch of the federal government that still stubbornly bans cameras from proceedings, we rely on audiotapes released later in the day to hear history unfold. It’s there where those of us who don’t get into the room get to listen for cadence, eloquence, and even humor.

PBS NewsHour: Supreme Court Considers Health Reform; Day 2 Recap: Individual Mandate on Trial

Web content

Arguments at the Supreme Court Tuesday dealt with whether Congress had the authority to require citizens to purchase health insurance and whether the government could issue a financial penalty for those who decline. Betty Ann Bowser reports then Marcia Coyle and Susan Dentzer discuss the day's proceedings with Gwen Ifill.

Review of ‘Obamacare’ Puts GOP Spotlight on Romney’s Massachusetts Health Care Law

On The Radar

Health care was supposed to be Mitt Romney’s Achilles’ heel: The state overhaul he championed as governor of Massachusetts is so similar to the sweeping federal law conservatives deride as “Obamacare” that it was once widely regarded as a big enough liability to doom his presidential chances. But Romney remains the overwhelming favorite in a topsy-turvy campaign in which health care has rarely been the driving issue, and he is picking up the support of prominent conservatives as he moves toward securing his party’s nomination.

Supreme Court Moves to Heart of Obama Healthcare Case

On The Radar

The Supreme Court confronted the core of President Barack Obama's healthcare law on Tuesday, zeroing in on whether Congress had the power to require most people in the United States to buy medical insurance.
Read More

Most Oppose at Least Part of Overhaul, Poll Finds

On The Radar

Two-thirds of Americans want the Supreme Court to overturn some or all of the health care law, even though large majorities support a few of its major aspects, according to a poll by The New York Times and CBS News. At the heart of the opposition is the individual mandate requiring Americans to obtain health insurance, the least popular part of the bill and a crucial piece at the center of the court arguments, which began Monday and will turn to the mandate on Tuesday.

Supreme Court Hears Historic Healthcare Law

On The Radar

President Barack Obama's sweeping healthcare overhaul on Monday went before the U.S. Supreme Court where the nine justices began hearing arguments in a historic test of the law's validity under the U.S. Constitution. The sweeping law intended to transform healthcare for millions of people in the United States has generated fierce political debate. Republican presidential hopefuls and members of Congress have vowed to roll back the March 23, 2010, law they say will financially burden states, businesses and individuals.

Employers Monitor Health Care Law Arguments

On The Radar

The Supreme Court won't rule on President Obama's health care case until June. Republicans vow to repeal the law if they win big in November. David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, talks to David Greene about how the ruling could affect doctors, hospitals, employers and consumers.

Why Supreme Court may uphold healthcare law

On The Radar

Conventional political wisdom holds that the Supreme Court, scheduled to hear a challenge to President Barack Obama's healthcare law beginning on Monday, is likely to strike it down on partisan lines. The court's Republican appointees enjoy a 5-4 majority. But a review of lower court rulings by conservative judges, subtle signals from individual justices, and interviews with professors and judges across the ideological spectrum suggest that presumption is wrong - and that the court will uphold the law.