Related Content: Iraq

Iraq War Ends With a Whimper, Not a Bang

On The Radar

The Iraq War began with Pentagon officials boasting about an initial offensive that would “shock and awe” the enemy, then-President George W. Bush flying a military plane to an aircraft carrier for a high-profile address to thousands of cheering troops, and round-the-clock coverage on the nation’s TV networks. Eight and a half grueling years later, the deeply unpopular conflict is set to end with a whimper, not a bang.

Veterans' unemployment outpaces civilian rate

On The Radar

As soon as Brian Joseph graduated from high school he joined the Army, where he was trained in a series of jobs that seem to exist only in the military.    He was a multi-channel radio operator. Then he worked as a single-channel radio operator. Later, he worked as a psychological operations specialist, tailoring the U.S. war message to residents of Kosovo and, later, Iraq.  Read more
 

Stop the Press

On The Radar

Iraqi journalism—which Washington had hoped would ensure a democratic, transparent government—faces an intense government crackdown. 

On the Radar: September 21, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

On the Radar: August 16, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

On the Radar: July 28, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

On the Radar: July 5, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

December 19, 2003

Vault Show

With the death of Osama bin Laden this week, we look back in the Vault to 2003 and the announcement--just 9-months after the start of the Iraq War--of the capture of former Iraqi President, Saddam Hussein. Bin Laden's capture was also a major priority at that time.

March 18, 2011

Weekly Show

President Obama and the U.N. warn Moammar Gadhafi to stop military action against rebels or face consequences. Meanwhile, after the earthquake, tsunami and partial nuclear plant meltdown in Japan, the U.S. reviews nuclear safety and a look at the global economic impact of the disaster.  Joining Gwen: Tom Gjelten, NPR; Coral Davenport, National Journal; and David Wessel, Wall Street Journal.
 

Predictions, Prophecies and the Perils of Prognostication

Gwen's Take

One of the things that I promise reporters who appear on “Washington Week” is that they will never have to make predictions. Even on the PBS NewsHour, where many of our guests actually make their livings by peering into crystal balls, we shy away from the practice.