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Election 2012: All the Bright and Shiny Objects

Gwen's Take

I have become an excellent tea-leaf reader this spring. As I watch college graduates cross the stage on commencement day -- teetering in new heels, arms outstretched to grasp their hard-earned diplomas -- I study the terror in their eyes.

And as I watch two party nominees stride onto their stages -- theme songs blaring, and huge American flags hung behind them -- I study the ambition in their eyes.

Cory Booker’s Real Mistake

Essential Reads

Cory Booker is a famous man of action. The mayor of Newark shovels walkways in heavy snowstorms. Recently, he rushed into a burning building to save a woman. Sunday night he was at it again, this time working fast to remove his foot from his mouth. On Sunday morning’s Meet the Press, Booker described President Obama's recent campaigns ads attacking Mitt Romney as "nauseating," comparing them to the foiled $10 million plan to remind voters that Obama was a longtime parishioner of the Rev. Jeremiah Wright.

Economy v. Favorability in Campaign 2012

Essential Reads

CBS News Chief White House Correspondent Norah O'Donnell and CBS News Political Director John Dickerson on the real issues in Campaign 2012.

May 18, 2012

Weekly Show

As attacks fly between President Obama and Mitt Romney, a conservative super PAC’s developed a controversial Rev. Wright ad campaign. Plus, is Congress heading towards another partisan debt-ceiling showdown? Also, JP Morgan’s losses and Wall Street regulation. Joining Gwen: Jeff Zeleny, New York Times; Karen Tumulty, Washington Post; David Wessel, Wall Street Journal; John Harwood, CNBC/NY Times.

 

Mitt Romney Distances Himself from Racially Fueled Proposal to Attack Obama

Essential Reads

Mitt Romney wants to talk about the economy. But his ostensible allies keep interrupting him, and his own party is threatening to drown him out. A reality of modern campaigning is that any candidate — even one as buttoned-down and disciplined as Romney — has to contend with stronger political crosswinds than in the past.