Related Content: Jim Tankersley

The Buffett Rule Won’t Get You a Job

On The Radar

On the seventh and final page of its background report on the "Buffett Rule," out this morning, the Obama administration finally dives into what it calls “the economic rationale” for imposing a new minimum tax rate on millionaires. If you’re an unemployed American, that placement should be your first red flag. The second should be the rationale itself.
Read More

Obama Resets Campaign Debate, But Not to Jobs

On The Radar

Any day now, someone is going to grab the wheel of the 2012 presidential election and yank it toward the issue that American voters overwhelmingly worry about: jobs. There are still 13 million Americans looking for work; the average time someone spends unemployed has soared to nearly 10 months. So the candidates can’t keep fighting over gas prices, contraception, and the specter of some ambiguously far-off debt crisis – can they?
Read More

Obama Budget Optimistic on Economic Growth, Again

On The Radar

President Obama’s economists are nothing if not optimistic. In the fiscal year 2013 presidential budget request, they’ve once again forecast higher future growth than their private-sector peers – about a half-point of gross domestic product growth more, per year, than the 45 economists included in the Philadelphia Fed’s Survey of Professional Forecasters.
Read More

February 3, 2012

Weekly Show

What do January’s unemployment numbers tell us about the economy? Plus, Mitt Romney won the Florida primary, but his comments about the poor are making headlines. Also, new FEC disclosures shine light on Super PAC money.

State of Hope—Or an Illusion?

On The Radar

The American economy is better off today than it was three years ago. It could be much better off than it is. Indicators suggest that growth may be finally ready to take off from its post-recession bumps along the runway—but then again, that’s how the indicators looked this time last year.
Read More

Romney's Bain Business is Everybody's Business

On The Radar

Mitt Romney has been in politics long enough to know that his record is intertwined with that of Bain Capital, the private-equity firm he cofounded. That’s why it’s so surprising that the Republican presidential front-runner is struggling to fend off his rivals’ attempt at a hostile takeover of his private-sector resume.
Read More from National Journal

Hey, Remember the ’80s?

On The Radar

Newt Gingrich’s economic plan is not Reaganesque. It is not, as so many of his Republican presidential rivals’ claim their plans to be, inspired by Reaganomics. It is Reaganomics, cryogenically frozen in 1981, thawed 30 years later, and pumped full of Newt-style steroids in order to save the American people from slow growth. The plan features massive tax cuts (which would largely benefit businesses and the wealthy), less government spending (through the privatization of entitlement programs), interest-rate hikes, and rampant deregulation.

December 2, 2011

Weekly Show

The unemployment rate fell last month to the lowest since March 2009. Is this a sign of the economy stabilizing? Also, Herman Cain faced allegations of an extramarital affair, Rick Perry had another “oops” moment, and Newt Gingrich surged in the polls. Joining Gwen: Jim Tankersley, National Journal; Greg Ip, The Economist; Karen Tumulty, The Washington Post; Jeff Zeleny, The New York Times
 

Contagion Catastrophe

On The Radar

This is the worst-case scenario from Europe, and it just might come true: Italy defaults on its debts. Every major Italian bank collapses. Recession grips the eurozone. Sovereign defaults and bank failures ripple across the Continent. Saddled with bad loans to nations and lenders in Europe, American banks hemorrhage cash. Credit freezes in the United States. Multinational companies, unable to raise money, curb U.S. investment and hiring. Wall Street demands, but fails to get, new bailouts. The entire developed world plummets into recession and, quite possibly, depression.

Jim Tankersley

Panelist Bios

Jim Tankersley is an economic policy correspondent for The Washington Post, which he joined in late 2012. He previously held a similar position at National Journal. He has also worked at the Tribune Company Washington Bureau, the Toledo Blade, the Rocky Mountain News and The Oregonian. In 2007 he and a Blade colleague won the Livingston Award for Young Journalists.