Related Content: John Boehner

Asked About Gay Rights, Boehner Sticks to Economy

Essential Reads

One day after President Barack Obama roiled the political world by declaring his support for gay marriage, House Speaker John Boehner (R., Ohio) Thursday seemed determined to keep his distance from the subject. Pressed on the gay marriage issue at his weekly press conference, Mr. Boehner repeatedly tried to steer the discussion back to the economy.

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Boehner: 1-in-3 Chance Democrats Could Take House

Essential Reads

House Speaker John Boehner (R., Ohio) is sending a cautionary message about the danger that the Democrats could retake the House in November, saying there is a one-in-three chance the GOP will lose its majority. “I would say that there is a two-in-three chance that we win control of the House again, but there’s a one-in-three chance that we could lose,” Mr. Boehner told Fox News in an interview to air Tuesday.

Who is Mitt Romney and What Does He Believe?

On The Radar

Mitt Romney has turned his attention to November’s presidential election, and the Republican establishment is beginning to fall in line behind him. Endorsements for him have grown from a stream to a flood this week, including from big names such as House Speaker John A. Boehner (Ohio), Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) and Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels.
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Election 2012 – Managing Alternatives

Gwen's Take

Updated:  Friday, Feb 10-4pm

One of the things we tell our children is that life is all about choices.

We celebrate this idea, because it is an essential part of the kind of ambition we want them to have. We want them to consider all the options, and then aspire to the best one.

In politics, the language of choice often comes loaded. School choice. Abortion rights. Public option. Proponents embrace these descriptions to put the best possible face on otherwise contentious issues.

Republicans Confident They'll Hang onto House

On The Radar

Republicans in the House of Representatives face a toxic national attitude toward Congress, but there remains broad confidence within the GOP that its control of the chamber is not in jeopardy. It's a message party leaders are sharing with their rank-and-file lawmakers gathered this weekend in Baltimore for their annual three-day retreat to develop policy and political strategy for 2012.
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House GOP Struggles with How to Legislate

On The Radar

Republicans worked last year to change the debate in Washington from one about spending money to one about cutting spending, but as the GOP enters the second year of its House majority, it is grappling with how to legislate in the face of Democratic opposition and division within their own ranks.
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Iowa Rep. Steve King Upset with Boehner

On The Radar

Iowa GOP Rep. Steve King is frustrated. A day after the conservative lawmaker opted against endorsing any of the Republican Party's presidential contenders competing in tonight's caucuses, he vented further about the party's leadership in Congress. King expressed "real clear frustration" with the leadership of House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, for two offenses in 2011: ruling out the possibility of a government shutdown during the budget debate in the spring, and ruling out a U.S. default during the debt ceiling debate in the summer.

Why Tea Party Freshmen Caved on Payroll Tax Deal

On The Radar

Conservative Tea Party-affiliated lawmakers spent weeks vowing to oppose the short-term compromise bill extending payroll tax cuts and unemployment insurance. But in the end, the bill glided through the House, just before Christmas. The final moments of this latest congressional showdown were fascinating not because of what happened but because of what didn't happen.
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December 23, 2011

Weekly Show

This week, we look back at 2011 and forward to 2012. We’ll analyze battles between Congress and the President, the economy, the killing of Osama bin Laden, the pullout of US troops in Iraq while fighting continues in Afghanistan, and more. Joining Gwen: Helene Cooper, New York Times; Michael Duffy, Time Magazine; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times; David Wessel, Wall Street Journal.

Behind the Scenes of the House Republicans' Self-Inflicted Wound

On The Radar

There was no formal cease-fire. Speaker John Boehner didn’t even call Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to offer up his payroll-tax sword of surrender. The great Christmas conflict over tax cuts ended at the staff level. Boehner’s chief of staff, Barry Jackson, cut the deal with Reid’s chief of staff, David Krone. If the weeklong tussle over a two-month or one-year extension of payroll taxes was over principle, the principal antagonist, Boehner, in the end, had neither the will nor the stomach to directly sue for peace.