Related Content: Kabul

The Advantage of Incumbency

Gwen's Take

Mitt Romney’s May Day plan seemed pretty reasonable for a man who had been systematically and successfully clearing his path to the Republican nomination for more than a year.

Republicans had been quietly dinging President Barack Obama throughout the previous weekend for appearing to be taking a victory lap leading up to the anniversary of the killing of Osama bin Laden.

Secrecy Paramount on Obama’s 36-Hour Secret Afghan Trip

Essential Reads

The cryptic call summoning reporters to the White House came at 12:19 p.m. Sunday from a private number and lasted only 25 seconds. By the following night, Air Force One was in the air. In the next 36 hours, the 13-member pool of reporters who travel wherever the president goes would spend almost 28 hours in the air, fly in dual-rotor Chinook helicopters across the Hindu Kush mountain range, visit the presidential palace in Kabul, cover an address to the nation. All of it done under a cover of darkness.

In Kabul, Obama Highlights Foreign Policy Record

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President Barack Obama answered political taunts with presidential muscle Tuesday, addressing the nation from Kabul as Republicans said he's overdoing the celebration of Osama bin Laden's death one year ago. The president's secret flight to Afghanistan — where he signed off on details for withdrawing U.S. troops from the decade-long war there — was the type of campaign counterpunch that may play out many times in his re-election battle against Republican Mitt Romney.

PBS NewsHour: Obama's Afghanistan Pact: What it Does, What it Doesn't Do

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President Obama made a surprise visit Tuesday to Afghanistan to mark the first anniversary of the killing of Osama bin Laden. Gwen Ifill gets an update from the AP's Patrick Quinn in Kabul plus analysis of the agreement the president signed from RAND Corporation's Seth Jones and Brian Katulis of the Center for American Progress.

U.S. Service Members Killed in Afghan Suicide Bomb Attack

On The Radar

At least five NATO service members and eight civilian contractors, many believed to be American, were killed in Kabul today when a land cruiser with 1,500 pounds of explosives blew up next to an armored U.S. bus -- the deadliest attack on U.S. troops in the Afghan capital in 10 years of war.

PBS NewsHour: Terror Network Behind 'Unprecedented,' Coordinated Kabul Attacks

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September 14, 2011

The U.S. Embassy and NATO headquarters were among the targets of Taliban fighters who infiltrated Afghanistan's capital on Tuesday. Gwen Ifill gets the latest on the deadly attacks from Patrick Quinn, The Associated Press's Kabul bureau chief.

On the Radar: September 14, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar