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GOP Rifts Exposed in South Carolina

Essential Reads

The challenges facing the Republican Party as it heads into the elections of 2014 and 2016 were on stark display here this weekend as South Carolina Republicans gathered for their annual convention, an event that revealed a party in the throes of some internal strife.

PBS NewsHour: Immigration Fallout: A White House Win?

Web content

President Obama's decision last week to help undocumented youths obtain work visas has rippled through the presidential campaigns. Gwen Ifill and Lisa Lerer of Bloomberg News discuss the political fallout, who the new policy affects and what it means for the Latino vote.

2012: The Year Demographics Catches Up With Politics

Gwen's Take

Christine Mastin, an immigration attorney whose Spanish-speaking grandmother emigrated from Chile to the United States, realizes that most of the Hispanics she knows are surprised she is a Republican.

Barack Obama won two-thirds of the Latino vote in 2008, and no Republican has come close to winning a majority in 40 years. But she is working Colorado for Mitt Romney.

And even though she ran for a state House seat in 2010 and lost, she is optimistic that the GOP will soon be able to crack the code.

Hispanic Leaders Divided on President Obama

Essential Reads

Because Hispanics, the fastest-growing segment of the US population, will play a big role in November's presidential election, leaders from the Hispanic community reinforced the notion that they are not a monolithic voting bloc.

Latino Voters Take Center Stage in Both Presidential Campaigns

On The Radar

With the GOP presidential nomination no longer in doubt, President Obama and Mitt Romney this week are urgently turning their focus to Hispanic voters — a group whose alienation from Republicans threatens GOP prospects for winning the White House and has given the Obama campaign an early opportunity to lock in the support of a key constituency.
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Obama to Vie for Arizona as Latino Numbers Rise

On The Radar

Republicans in the State Legislature here push a law that would require President Obama to provide his long-form birth certificate in order to get on the Arizona presidential ballot in 2012. The governor uses Facebook to denounce the president’s “backdoor amnesty plan.” Cars traveling on State Route 260 are treated to a giant billboard bearing Mr. Obama’s mug on a mock $100 trillion bill that asks, “But Who Will Pay the Piper?” Given the openly hostile environment, Mr.

Dog-Whistling on Immigration Through Endorsements

On The Radar

For a fascinating study in contrasts, consider the dueling endorsements trotted out today by Republican presidential candidates Mitt Romney and Rick Perry. Romney, who has taken a hardline position on immigration that emphasizes border security above all else, campaigned this morning in Miami with three current and former Cuban-American members of Congress who have all championed legislation that would offer a illegal immigrants a pathway to cititzenship.

Will Romney’s immigration stance become his Latino problem?

On The Radar

In dealing with the issue of immigration, Mitt Romney’s 2012 strategy is exactly like his 2008 strategy — run to the right, liberally use the words “amnesty” and “magnet,” and occasionally refer to illegal immigrants as simply “illegals.” The issue has emerged as one of the few where Romney has tried to credibly claim to be the most conservative candidate and where he has seemed to lose sight of the general election, where Latino voters will be crucial. So far, the strategy worked well with Texas Gov.