Related Content: Libya

Springboard or setback? Romney sought, now faces foreign-policy test

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Mitt Romney’s swift criticism of administration policy amid deadly protests in Libya and violence in Cairo touched a nerve and could mark a turning point for a campaign that has avoided foreign policy and direct engagement with President Obama on the dangers and opportunities of the still-smoldering Arab Spring.

U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens, 3 other Americans die in Libya consulate attack

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Libya's interior minister said Wednesday that the U.S. Ambassador to Libya, Christopher Stevens, was killed when armed Islamist militants overran the U.S. consulate in Libya’s second largest city, in a day of rage that also struck the U.S. Embassy in Cairo, where demonstrators hauled down the American flag, tore it to pieces and burned it.

For the White House, a Wary Wait as Syria Boils

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After ordering American forces to Libya last year, President Obama declared that he had tackled a humanitarian crisis more decisively than his predecessors. “When people were being brutalized in Bosnia in the 1990s,” Mr. Obama told a national television audience, “it took the international community more than a year to intervene with air power to protect civilians. It took us 31 days.”

When are GOP candidates going to take on Herman Cain?

On The Radar

It's hard to remember a presidential candidate who seemed more, er, unacquainted with the national dialogue -- or presidential prerequisites -- than Herman Cain.

More Than Luck: A veteran intelligence chief talks about finally connecting the dots.

On The Radar

In a string of successful operations this year, U.S. counterterrorism forces have drawn a bead on the top tier of the terrorist hierarchy. They killed Qaida chief Osama bin Laden last May, and then Anwar al-Awlaki and Samir Khan, two top leaders in al-Qaida’s dangerous franchise in Yemen. Ten years after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, U.S. officials seem to be accurately “connecting the dots” from terrorism plots back to the masterminds who hatched them.

PBS NewsHour: Arab Spring Update: Tunisia, Libya and Syria

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Part 1: Tunisia, the birthplace of the Arab spring, held its first truly democratic vote this weekend. Their Libyan neighbors continued to celebrate the death of Moammar Gadhafi, though more questions about his death continue. Meanwhile, there was no end in sight to the uprising in Syria against President Bashar al Assad.

Obama's foreign successes may help little in 2012

On The Radar

By declaring the Iraq war over, President Barack Obama scored what his allies see as a fourth big foreign policy success in six months, starting with Osama bin Laden's killing.

McManus: Mosque and State

On The Radar

At a conference two years ago, I sat in on a meeting between U.S. officials and young Islamist politicians from Tunisia, Jordan and other countries in the Middle East. The Islamists wanted to know: Would the Americans allow them to run in free elections, even if it meant they might come to power? The Americans turned the question back at them: Would the Islamists, if they won, allow free and democratic elections, even if it might mean losing power?

October 21, 2011

Weekly Show

Analysis of possible paths forward in Libya now that Moammar Gadhafi is dead. Will the U.S. play a role in nation building?  President Obama announces all U.S. troops will be out of Iraq by year's end. And why the GOP debates have become pivotal in the 2012 presidential race.  Joining Gwen: Martha Raddatz, ABC News; Doyle McManus, LA Times; Dan Balz, Washington Post; Gloria Borger, CNN.

PBS NewsHour: Looking Back at Gadhafi's Brutal, Sometimes Bizarre 42-Year Reign

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Moammar Gadhafi, killed by rebel forces on Thursday, had been hunted by rebels since the Arab Spring began in Libya in February. Gwen Ifill reports on how the dictator came to power, his 42-year rule and his mostly contentious relationship with the U.S.