Related Content: Mitt Romney

Gingrich, Romney Prepare for January Collision

On The Radar

Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney, who have spent much of this year ignoring one another, are now on a collision course in the contest for the Republican presidential nomination, facing a series of state-by-state battles in January that will possibly decide the race by testing which one can best surmount his own weaknesses.

Is GOP Race Turning into a Circus?

On The Radar

No doubt about it, the Republican presidential candidates are reaching a critical point: It's less than one month before the Iowa caucuses. A majority of GOP voters -- and Iowa caucus-goers -- say they could still change their minds. The president has thrown down the gauntlet on tax cuts for the middle class, and the GOP needs to speak with one voice in response. It's decision time, and there are real questions that need to be answered with clarity. So, who's going to show up at Donald Trump's debate? Um, not exactly what the GOP should be worried about.

Democrats See a Two-Horse G.O.P. Race, Adding a Whip

On The Radar

The White House and its allies are starting to turn their sights to Newt Gingrich, invoking his tumultuous history as House speaker to brand him as the “godfather of gridlock,” a testament to his new viability and the sudden realization that he could be President Obama’s Republican opponent.

Allies Urge Romney to Mix it up More in Campaign

On The Radar

Mitt Romney's above-the-fray campaign style kept him atop the Republican presidential field for months. But it's raising concerns now that Newt Gingrich has moved up to challenge him.

In Iowa, Gingrich Is Gaining Favor, New Poll Shows

On The Radar

Newt Gingrich enters the final four weeks of campaigning before the Iowa caucuses with Republican voters in the state viewing him as more prepared to be president than Mitt Romney, more attuned to their concerns and just as capable of defeating President Obama, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll.

Gingrich Surges Ahead in Iowa

On The Radar

A month before the Republican nominating contest opens here, former Speaker Newt Gingrich holds a substantial lead among voters who say they are likely to participate in the Iowa caucuses, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News poll. Mr. Gingrich, whose presidential candidacy has steadily surged in recent weeks after a series of televised debates, won the support of 31 percent of Republicans and independents who say they will definitely or probably attend the Iowa caucuses on Jan. 3.

Republican Romney to Skip Trump Debate

On The Radar

U.S. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney said on Tuesday that he will not attend a controversial Dec. 27 debate to be moderated by real estate magnate Donald Trump, as have candidates Ron Paul and former Utah Governor Jon Huntsman. Romney told Fox News' Neil Cavuto that he will not participate in the Iowa debate, which has drawn fire from Washington Republicans as well as two of Romney's competitors.
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Gingrich Emerges as Clear Front-Runner in Iowa

On The Radar

Propelled by his debate performances and the demise of Herman Cain’s candidacy, former House speaker Newt Gingrich sits atop the Republican presidential field in Iowa with a clear lead over his closest competitors, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll. Gingrich, according to the survey, has advantages that extend well beyond the horse race that put him in an enviable position in the final weeks before the state’s Jan. 3 caucuses, which serve as the formal start of the long nominating season.

More Like Reagan?

On The Radar

Conservatives prize constancy above all else, but if Republicans are really faced with a choice between Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney, this will be a nomination defined by reversals. Nominating Gingrich will require conservatives to embrace a sweeping ideological reversal. Nominating Romney will require Republicans to embrace a candidate who is defined by personal reversals.
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Watching TV in Iowa

On The Radar

For an interesting study in contrasts, compare the television advertising broadcast by the leading Republican presidential candidates ads in Iowa. The most distinctive quality of Newt Gingrich's first ad is its speed: slow motion. Going for the heartstrings, the spot showcases amber waves of grain to purple mountain majesties, joining the scores of homages to Ronald Reagan's beloved "It's morning again in America'' ad. Gingrich says, "Some people say the America we know and love is a thing of the past. I don't believe that.