Related Content: New Hampshire

In NH, GOP Voters' Questions Often Omit Jobs

On The Radar

Judging from the presidential forums being held all over New Hampshire ahead of Tuesday's Republican primary, the biggest threats to America appear to be online piracy, an insidious United Nations and "crony capitalism." Rick Santorum, for instance, fielded questions for 48 minutes from a crowd of 600 in Windham on Thursday before anyone mentioned jobs, the issue that's supposed to dominate the 2012 elections.
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My Baloney Has a First Name, It’s M-I-T-T

On The Radar

Newt Gingrich spoke for everyone in America when he asked during the NBC News-Facebook New Hampshire debate, "Can we drop a little bit of the pious baloney?" Gingrich was talking to Mitt Romney, but let his exasperated call reach President Obama and leaders in Congress and let it ring in the ears of all the GOP candidates on that stage. Newt Gingrich is not immune to the request. Any candidate who says his adultery came in part from loving the country too much knows how to slice that baloney thick and wriggling.

Perry Unplugged at New Hampshire Debate

On The Radar

Texas Gov. Rick Perry is losing and acting like he's got nothing to lose -- skewering fellow Republicans running for president as wimpy job creators and congressional Republicans who spent too much money long before before President Obama was elected. "Obama has thrown gasoline on the fire," Perry said at the NBC News/Facebook debate on Sunday. "But the bonfire was burning well before Obama got there. It was policies and spending both from Wall Street and from the insiders in Washington, D.C., that got us in this problem."

Gingrich Says Bain Capital Looted Companies

On The Radar

Newt Gingrich assailed Mitt Romney’s business background of buying and selling companies at the investment firm Bain Capital, saying Sunday afternoon that the work was comparable to “rich people figuring out clever legal ways to loot a company.” Newt Gingrich assailed Mitt Romney’s business background of buying and selling companies at the investment firm Bain Capital, saying Sunday afternoon that the work was comparable to “rich people figuring out clever legal ways to loot a company.”

PBS NewsHour: What Do New Hampshire's Voters Want in a Republican Nominee?

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The entire Republican presidential field will share a stage Saturday in Manchester, N.H., for the first of two weekend debates. But what are Granite State voters looking for in a GOP nominee? Gwen Ifill spoke with five Republican and Independent voters in New Hampshire.

January 6, 2012

Weekly Show

This week, we’re on the ground in Manchester, New Hampshire to preview the primaries. After a close finish in Iowa, will Mitt Romney stay ahead of the pack in the Granite State? Joining Gwen: Dan Balz,  Washington Post; John Dickerson, Slate Magazine and CBS News; Julianna Goldman, Bloomberg News; John Harwood, CNBC and The New York Times.
 

On the Road in New Hampshire

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Santorum Draws Boos From College Crowd for Opposing Gay Marriage

On The Radar

Rick Santorum, whose surprising second-place finish in the Iowa caucuses has propelled him to the upper tier of Republican presidential candidates, was booed during an appearance before college students in New Hampshire yesterday when he spoke of his opposition to same-sex marriage.
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Santorum Channeling Pat Buchanan Faces a Changed New Hampshire

On The Radar

Rick Santorum, working to channel the populist success of Patrick Buchanan in New Hampshire, may be unable to recreate the coalition he needs to finish strong in the state’s Jan. 10 Republican presidential primary. Buchanan scored an upset win in New Hampshire (GSPSNH)’s 1996 primary by consolidating a group of working-class voters stressed over threats to manufacturing jobs and a smaller bloc of anti-abortion Catholics.

Romney’s the Target, but His GOP Opponents Keep Attacking One Another in N.H.

On The Radar

All of the Republican presidential candidates not named Mitt Romney have been trying desperately to make the case that they can beat President Obama this fall, hoping to blunt Romney’s electability argument that he is the only one in the race who can do that. But on Thursday, in town hall meetings and other campaign stops across New Hampshire, where Romney leads by double-digit margins in most polls, the “not-Romneys” kept getting distracted by the urge to turn on one another.