Related Content: Newt Gingrich

The Road to the White House: Gutting it Out

Gwen's Take

Michael Dukakis was the first politician I ever heard describe the Presidential campaign as a “marathon, not a sprint.” But he was not the last.

Since the first campaign I covered in 1988, I’ve always been sort of impressed by candidates who – win or lose—just hang in there.

Sometimes it is unfathomable. Hopefuls stay on the trail long after their viability has been expended, as a race for the White House morphs into a campaign to get politics’ ultimate consolation prize -- a speaking role at the party’s nominating convention.

Romney’s Rivals Have Scant Hope of Closing the Delegate Gap

On The Radar

Though Mitt Romney’s opponents continue to insist there is a road to the Republican presidential nomination for them after the Super Tuesday contests, the arithmetic suggests otherwise. How long it will take for the other contenders and their supporters to figure that out — and to make peace with it — is another question.
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5 Things to Watch For On Super Tuesday

Gwen's Take

At the end of a long evening of introductions and speeches, President Clinton used to like to say that everything had been said, but everyone had not yet said it.

If you follow politics, you already may have read all the pre-game analysis you can stand in advance of the pivotal Super Tuesday primaries.

What? You say you haven’t? Then, please allow me.

Political Landscape: Ohio

Web content

Of the states holding primaries on Super Tuesday, among most closely watched is Ohio. Ohio has 66 of the 419 delegates awarded next week and has seen a slew of negative advertising by candidates and Super PACs. Rick Santorum is leading in the polls, but Mitt Romney has scored some key endorsements from local politicians. Karen Kasler of Ohio Public Television previews the primary.


Cover photo: FlickrCC/Tim Balogh

PBS NewsHour: Deconstructing a Republican Hopeful's Road to 1,144 Delegates

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The Republican Party's eventual nominee needs to secure 1,144 delegates. With wins in Michigan and Arizona Wednesday, Mitt Romney leads the GOP field with 135. Gwen Ifill discusses Super Tuesday, when a sizable 419 delegates are at stake, with Political Editor Christina Bellantoni and Frontloading HQ's Josh Putnam.

Revenge of the 'super PACs'

On The Radar

Chalk up another win for the law of unintended consequences. When federal courts ruled in 2010 against restricting donations to political action committees, Republican strategists rejoiced. Here, they thought, was a way for the GOP's deep-pocketed donors to gain an advantage over President Obama's fundraising machine. But look what happened. "Super PACs," as the newly empowered political action committees are known, have mutated like election-year Godzillas, wreaking havoc in an increasingly bloody Republican primary campaign.

Taking the 2012 Authenticity Test

Gwen's Take

PHOENIX -- If there is one reliable source of applause to be found along the Republican primary trail this year, it is ignited by candidates who boast of being able to speak without a Teleprompter.

The speech delivery device used by presidents, candidates, dinner emcees and, yes, television news anchors, has become an object of extended mockery wherever Republican politics is practiced. (Full disclosure: I use them on almost a daily basis. I love them.)

Out of Air in Arizona

On The Radar

he 20th and perhaps final Republican presidential debate wheezed across the finish line and collapsed. At times it felt like the candidates had already talked themselves out on the big themes and could only bicker over table scraps. There was a long symposium on how earmarks and the congressional appropriating process work. Then, there was a confusing discussion of Arlen Specter, his re-election, and the judiciary committee. Who won? Ask the undecided Republicans in Michigan.

Mitt Romney Attacks Put Rick Santorum on Defensive in GOP Presidential Debate

On The Radar

Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum was thrown on the defensive here Wednesday night as rival Mitt Romney attacked the former senator over spending and earmarks and accused him of compiling an inconsistent and contradictory record. In the first GOP debate since he won a trio of states two weeks ago, Santorum fired back, accusing Romney of his own inconsistencies, but he struggled under repeated criticism to explain his record. The squabbling became so intense at times that the two talked past each other, with voices raised, each trying to gain the upper hand.

The Last, Best Hope for Conservatives

On The Radar

At CPAC in 2011, Newt Gingrich took the stage to the stirring sound of Survivor's 1980’s rock anthem "Eye of the Tiger." He walked deliberately through the crowd. Here was Caesar returning from the wars.