Related Content: Obama

Obama Testing 2-Tier Strategy for Re-election

On The Radar

Just three hours after President Obama announced that he was defying Congressional Republicans to fill a high-level regulatory position while lawmakers were out of town, Mitt Romney sent out the obligatory news release ripping the president. “Chicago-style politics at its worst,” Mr. Romney fumed, accusing the president of “circumventing Congress.”
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Romney’s the Target, but His GOP Opponents Keep Attacking One Another in N.H.

On The Radar

All of the Republican presidential candidates not named Mitt Romney have been trying desperately to make the case that they can beat President Obama this fall, hoping to blunt Romney’s electability argument that he is the only one in the race who can do that. But on Thursday, in town hall meetings and other campaign stops across New Hampshire, where Romney leads by double-digit margins in most polls, the “not-Romneys” kept getting distracted by the urge to turn on one another.

Obama's 2011: Defiance Sets Tone for '12

On The Radar

What did President Obama learn about governance in 2011? His detractors say "not enough." But his Democratic base thinks he's finally listening to them, and looking tougher as a result. It was a year in which the economy and Congress were both stalled, and Americans were roughly divided about the job the president was doing. Obama began the year by talking up spending freezes, smaller deficits and "winning the future" for the American economy.

Why Tea Party Freshmen Caved on Payroll Tax Deal

On The Radar

Conservative Tea Party-affiliated lawmakers spent weeks vowing to oppose the short-term compromise bill extending payroll tax cuts and unemployment insurance. But in the end, the bill glided through the House, just before Christmas. The final moments of this latest congressional showdown were fascinating not because of what happened but because of what didn't happen.
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Behind the Scenes of the House Republicans' Self-Inflicted Wound

On The Radar

There was no formal cease-fire. Speaker John Boehner didn’t even call Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to offer up his payroll-tax sword of surrender. The great Christmas conflict over tax cuts ended at the staff level. Boehner’s chief of staff, Barry Jackson, cut the deal with Reid’s chief of staff, David Krone. If the weeklong tussle over a two-month or one-year extension of payroll taxes was over principle, the principal antagonist, Boehner, in the end, had neither the will nor the stomach to directly sue for peace.

Lawmakers Reach Deal on Payroll Tax

On The Radar

The ice cracked under House Speaker John Boehner on Thursday. A deal to quiet a bruising political eruption over the payroll tax finally took shape -- after relentless criticism from within GOP ranks that House Republicans had dug themselves knee-deep in quicksand. After days of thrashing and teeth-gnashing, Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell offered a way out of the mess with a statement underscoring similarities between the measures in the two chambers, rather than differences.

Obama, Senate Democrats Rally for Benefits Extension

On The Radar

President Obama and Senate Democrats appealed to House Republicans on Wednesday to return to Washington and approve a two-month extension of benefits for American workers before they expire Dec. 31. The House GOP remains opposed to a short-term patch despite mounting opposition to the strategy, even from within the party.
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Congress's Payroll Standoff - Who Blinks First?

On The Radar

Less than two weeks remain – with a holiday in between – for Congress to keep alive a payroll-tax cut, unemployment insurance, and a “doc fix” patch. Here is how it could play out.
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Obama Approval Rating Shows Signs of Rebound in Two Polls

On The Radar

President Barack Obama’s approval ratings are showing signs of rebounding following some recent positive economic data and after months of aggressively promoting his jobs plan and criticizing his Republican opposition. Forty-nine percent of Americans approve of how Obama is handling his job, according to an ABC News/Washington Post poll and another conducted for CNN.
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House Rejects 2-Month Extension of Payroll Tax Cut

On The Radar

The Republican-controlled House on Tuesday rejected a Senate-approved two-month extension of a payroll tax cut and unemployment benefits to millions of Americans, raising the likelihood that both will expire on Dec. 31.The House effectively adjourned for the year following the vote, and with the Senate out of town for the holiday, there is no resolution in sight on a legislative battle waged by House Republicans over the length of the benefits' extension. Both chambers can return to Washington at the call of party leaders if there is an agreement.