Related Content: Osama bin Laden

'Zero Dark Thirty': Bin Laden manhunt film based on controversial firsthand accounts: 'Nightline' exclusive

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Ex-Navy SEAL faces legal jeopardy for writing about bin Laden raid

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What legal consequences could a former U.S. Navy SEAL face for writing a book about the still-classified 2011 raid that killed Osama bin Laden?

Bin Laden Documents Offer Different Picture of Terrorist Leader

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U.S. officials have long argued that Osama bin Laden was actively plotting new attacks inside the United States right up to the end, including ambitious plans for strikes timed to the anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks or designed to derail passenger trains and cause large numbers of civilian deaths. But that’s not the picture of the leader which emerges from Thursday’s release of nearly 200 pages of materials recovered from the bin Laden compound after his killing at the hands of American commandos one year ago.

Recovered Bin Laden Letters Show a Divided Al Qaeda

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Sitting in his secret refuge, hiding from the world, Osama bin Laden spent the last months of his life rethinking strategy, worrying about his legacy and struggling to maintain control over the sprawling terrorist network that operated in his name. He had grown disgruntled with far-flung offshoots theoretically under his umbrella and fretted that too many of the “brothers” were alienating Muslims with attacks on fellow believers.

The Advantage of Incumbency

Gwen's Take

Mitt Romney’s May Day plan seemed pretty reasonable for a man who had been systematically and successfully clearing his path to the Republican nomination for more than a year.

Republicans had been quietly dinging President Barack Obama throughout the previous weekend for appearing to be taking a victory lap leading up to the anniversary of the killing of Osama bin Laden.

Secrecy Paramount on Obama’s 36-Hour Secret Afghan Trip

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The cryptic call summoning reporters to the White House came at 12:19 p.m. Sunday from a private number and lasted only 25 seconds. By the following night, Air Force One was in the air. In the next 36 hours, the 13-member pool of reporters who travel wherever the president goes would spend almost 28 hours in the air, fly in dual-rotor Chinook helicopters across the Hindu Kush mountain range, visit the presidential palace in Kabul, cover an address to the nation. All of it done under a cover of darkness.

Bin Laden and Ballots

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We're far enough away from it now that we can probably all agree: It was a mistake for George W. Bush to land on that aircraft carrier in a flight suit to proclaim "Mission Accomplished." And not just because the war in Iraq was far from over at that point. Every president crows about his successes in war — assuming he has anything to crow about. But he should try to seem modest and statesmanlike while doing so.

Obama Says With War Near End, Defeat of al-Qaeda in Reach

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President Barack Obama assured the American public the defeat of al-Qaeda is within reach as he marked the first anniversary of the killing of Osama bin Laden with a visit to Afghanistan and an agreement that prepares the way to bring U.S. troops home. “My fellow Americans, we have traveled through more than a decade under the dark cloud of war,” Obama said at Bagram Airfield, where he had arrived about six hours earlier. “Yet here, in the pre-dawn darkness of Afghanistan, we can see the light of a new day on the horizon.”

Charlie Wilson's War; Obama's Peace

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Embedded deep within President Obama's appearance in Afghanistan on the one-year anniversary of the special forces raid that killed 9/11 architect Osama bin Laden was a post-Cold War commander-in-chief's declaration he wouldn't repeat the mistakes of his Cold War predecessors. Obama didn't say it in so many words, but his 11-minute address to the nation from Bagram Air Base was a promise to wage Charlie Wilson's war under the guise of Obama's peace.

In Kabul, Obama Highlights Foreign Policy Record

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President Barack Obama answered political taunts with presidential muscle Tuesday, addressing the nation from Kabul as Republicans said he's overdoing the celebration of Osama bin Laden's death one year ago. The president's secret flight to Afghanistan — where he signed off on details for withdrawing U.S. troops from the decade-long war there — was the type of campaign counterpunch that may play out many times in his re-election battle against Republican Mitt Romney.