Related Content: Osama bin Laden

Even Despots Don't Live Forever

On The Radar

It was a bad year for the villains of the world. Three of the biggest bad guys met their ends: Osama bin Laden, killed by U.S. commandos who stormed his villa in Pakistan in May; Moammar Kadafi, killed by Libyan insurgents who captured him (with the help of a NATO airstrike) in October; and Kim Jong Il, the ruler of North Korea, who died Dec. 17, reportedly of a heart attack.
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December 23, 2011

Weekly Show

This week, we look back at 2011 and forward to 2012. We’ll analyze battles between Congress and the President, the economy, the killing of Osama bin Laden, the pullout of US troops in Iraq while fighting continues in Afghanistan, and more. Joining Gwen: Helene Cooper, New York Times; Michael Duffy, Time Magazine; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times; David Wessel, Wall Street Journal.

More Than Luck: A veteran intelligence chief talks about finally connecting the dots.

On The Radar

In a string of successful operations this year, U.S. counterterrorism forces have drawn a bead on the top tier of the terrorist hierarchy. They killed Qaida chief Osama bin Laden last May, and then Anwar al-Awlaki and Samir Khan, two top leaders in al-Qaida’s dangerous franchise in Yemen. Ten years after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, U.S. officials seem to be accurately “connecting the dots” from terrorism plots back to the masterminds who hatched them.

Obama's foreign successes may help little in 2012

On The Radar

By declaring the Iraq war over, President Barack Obama scored what his allies see as a fourth big foreign policy success in six months, starting with Osama bin Laden's killing.

Why the End of Gadhafi May Not Help Obama

Gwen's Take

Three years into his Presidency, Barack Obama is turning out to be quite the tough guy.

Osama bin Laden is a bad memory. Anwar al-Awlaki – an American citizen no less – is gone. And now, thanks to U.S.-led support, Moammar Gadhafi – an ally turned pariah – is dead as well.

The War in Afghanistan Begins

Vault Show

As the war in Afghanistan hits its 10 year anniversary this week, we look back at the Washington Week from October 12, 2001. At the time, President George W. Bush suggested that the war "may take a year or two but we will prevail." NPR's Tom Gjelten analyze the military strategy, the status of the Taliban and the developing Bush's doctrine.

All The King's Horses And All The King's Men

Gwen's Take

In the fine tradition of the well-executed post mortem, we now find ourselves in the season of the "tick tock" -- the well-reported explanations of how a big story unfolded.

We have been treated to the finest of the genre in the days since the President was finally able to put ink to paper and sign the much wrangled- over legislation to raise the nation's debt limit.

On the Radar: June 15, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

May 13, 2011

Weekly Show

The impact of Osama bin Laden’s death continues to ripple, straining the U.S.’s relationship with Pakistan. After a bump in the polls, Obama returns to domestic policy while the GOP presidential field adds a few more candidates. Joining Gwen: David Sanger, New York Times; Nancy Youssef, McClatchy Newspapers; John Dickerson, Slate/CBS News; Dan Balz, Washington Post.
 

On the Radar: May 9, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar