Related Content: partisan

Six senators sound bipartisan alarm over sequester

Essential Reads

Six Republican and Democratic senators are urging their party leaders to find a way to avert the spending cuts slated begin Jan. 2, a rare bipartisan warning that that the so-called sequester could have a “devastating impact’’ on defense and domestic programs.

Maine Candidate: Don't Assume Party Affiliation

Essential Reads

Angus King is running for the Senate on a campaign pledge to tell voters how he will vote right after they elect him in November. The independent candidate, a popular former governor, is the front-runner in the open race for the seat held by retiring GOP Sen. Olympia Snowe. He is running a campaign on a platform of changing Congress and resisting partisanship, which is complicated by the fact that senators must align with a party to receive committee assignments and determine control of the chamber.

In New Gambit, Obama Asks Voters to Break Washington Stalemate

Essential Reads

The choice election that President Obama talks about is now moving, by his own rhetoric, closer to a referendum on his record in office. That’s but one unmistakable consequence of Obama’s repeated call for voters this November to “break the stalemate” in Washington by giving him another term in office. In his 54-minute speech in Cleveland, Obama once again called the election a choice. But he also said breaking the political and policy stalemate in Washington is all the election is about. Everything else, Obama said, is “just noise, just a distraction.”

Dearth of Civility in the Public Square

Gwen's Take

Flash back with me to sixth grade recess. A bit of taunting that turns into a little shoving and trash talking. Next thing you know, a circle of children are egging each other you on, chanting: “Fight! Fight! Fight!”

What choice did you have but to fight? It wasn’t a very civil thing to do, but this was elementary school.

Now, we live in a world of sixth grade taunting everywhere we look, where disagreements are settled on the playground of dueling campaign appearances and pundit-driven cable television debates.

A Kinder, Gentler Jeb Bush

Essential Reads

Former Gov. Jeb Bush has been sounding downright squishy lately, decrying partisan backbiting and waxing poetic about compromise. He sighed that his father, former President George H.W. Bush, and former President Ronald Reagan would have a "hard time'' fitting into today's Republican Party because they were willing to seek consensus with Democrats.

Democrats Want a Fighting President

Essential Reads

Americans increasingly want their presidents to fight for what they believe in rather than seek compromise — and much of the attitude change comes from Democrats, a fresh look at the latest Wall Street Journal/NBC News Poll shows.

Read More

A smart phone captures a snap shot of President Obama in the East Room of the White House (CNN)

Boehner: No Budget Brinksmanship From Me

Essential Reads

House Speaker John Boehner (R., Ohio) professed bafflement Thursday about the reaction to his comment Wednesday that any increase in the debt limit at the end of the year must be accompanied by spending cuts and other savings of greater value.

After Divisive Primary, Shifting to the Center

Essential Reads

Presidential nominees have several options for repositioning after ideologically charged primary campaigns: strategic silence, new proposals, a different tone on the brighter general election stage. And sometimes they can do nothing and watch their rivals do the shifting.

Boehner: 1-in-3 Chance Democrats Could Take House

Essential Reads

House Speaker John Boehner (R., Ohio) is sending a cautionary message about the danger that the Democrats could retake the House in November, saying there is a one-in-three chance the GOP will lose its majority. “I would say that there is a two-in-three chance that we win control of the House again, but there’s a one-in-three chance that we could lose,” Mr. Boehner told Fox News in an interview to air Tuesday.

Target Lugar: Mayhem in Indiana

Gwen's Take

Updated: 4/13/12 10:40pm

INDIANAPOLIS -- On the morning after the season's only Indiana Senate primary debate, state Treasurer Richard Mourdock arose early and headed for a Rotary Club in suburban Noblesville. There were fewer than 20 people there, which meant there was plenty of sausage, egg and waffle casserole to go around.

The club's president announced he was stepping down as the town's top Rotarian. Then he turned to Mourdock, who is attempting to unseat 80-year-old incumbent Sen. Richard Lugar, R-Ind., and winked. "The time comes for everybody to retire," he said.