Related Content: partisan

Court’s Potential to Goad Voters Swings to Democrats

On The Radar

For decades, Republicans have railed every four years against the Supreme Court and its perceived liberal activism to spur conservatives to elect presidents who will appoint like-minded justices. Now strategists in both parties are suggesting this could be the Democrats’ year to make the court a foil to mobilize voters.
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PBS NewsHour: Retiring Sens. Snowe, Bingaman: Political Center Is Disappearing

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Retiring Senators Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) and Jeff Bingaman(D-N.M.) think the political middle ground is disappearing in Washington. Gwen talks to them about the current state of politics.

Death of Bipartisanship Has Killed the Washington Deal

On The Radar

Every time there is divided government in Washington, there is a revival — among elite journalists, think tank commentators and respectable politicians of all stripes — of a cherished idea about how business should get done in the nation’s capital: Get the most responsible adults of both parties in one room, shoo away the cameras and microphones, and don’t let the two sides come out until they have cut a deal on the most pressing problem of the day.
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Obama Makes Populist Pitch

On The Radar

President Barack Obama offered Americans a populist economic vision in his State of the Union address Tuesday, seeking to draw a contrast with his eventual Republican rival and demonstrating the widening policy gulf between the two political parties.
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Why Tea Party Freshmen Caved on Payroll Tax Deal

On The Radar

Conservative Tea Party-affiliated lawmakers spent weeks vowing to oppose the short-term compromise bill extending payroll tax cuts and unemployment insurance. But in the end, the bill glided through the House, just before Christmas. The final moments of this latest congressional showdown were fascinating not because of what happened but because of what didn't happen.
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Hate Washington? Join The Club

Gwen's Take

Welcome to my hometown. There are few places in the world that people hate so much, yet expend such extraordinary effort trying to get to.

Myself, I find much to love about Washington. The monuments are pretty. The green spaces are well-manicured. The museums are astounding (and mostly free). And it is just Southern enough to produce good food and good people.

But if there is one thing that never seems to change, it is that the rest of the country has come to hate the caricature the city has become.

Debating the Debate

Gwen's Take

I got a lot of mail this week, almost all of it online, and much of it angry. The reason? I tried to tell both sides of a story.

The occasion was our PBS NewsHour “Spotlight Series” in Tampa, Florida. Periodically, we try to break out of the Beltway to make the connection between the stories we cover here in Washington and the effect they have on peoples’ lives.