Related Content: Paul Ryan

Medicare Spending Growth Rising Slower but Enrollment Will Rise

On The Radar

Throughout Medicare’s 46-year-old history, monitoring the cost of the government health plan for the elderly has been a bit like the old joke: No one asked if spending would jump. They only asked how high. But in early 2010, the number crunchers at Medicare headquarters in Baltimore saw something surprising: a sharp drop in the volume of doctor visits and other outpatient services. Instead of growing at the usual 4 percent a year, the number of claims was suddenly climbing by less than 2 percent.

Paul Ryan to Announce New Approach to Preserving Medicare

On The Radar

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, who has been castigated by Democrats and hailed by Republicans for his plan to privatize Medicare, will on Thursday unveil a new approach that would preserve the 46-year-old federal health program. Working with Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden (Ore.), the Wisconsin Republican is developing a framework that would offer traditional, government-run Medicare as an option for future retirees along with a variety of private plans.

Newt by Proxy

On The Radar

In 1995, then-House Speaker Newt Gingrich banned proxy votes in committees. That meant no longer could powerful chairmen (for 40 years previous, all Democrats) cast votes for lawmakers who skipped out on the marking-up of legislation. This is ironic because the reason Gingrich is the Republican presidential front-runner today is that several big-name Republicans essentially cast their proxy vote for him.

Fantasies of a Debt Deal From a Convivial Congress

On The Radar

Let’s play Congressional supercommittee! — the fantasy football version. Democratic members, whose forebears created the entitlement programs that senior citizens cherish, really don’t want to cut them. But they fear that fiscal sanity requires it.

Pick Your Poison: How Compromise Ceased To Be A Choice

Gwen's Take

It happened again the other day. Someone in the audience I was speaking to in Newark, New Jersey wanted to know: “Is compromise too much to hope for in Washington?”

And once again, I had to duck the question. I simply don’t know. But the signs are not good.

I spend my days sorting through the pronouncements of our leaders in search of answers to thorny questions like this.

The Gospel According to Bill Clinton

Gwen's Take

It never gets old listening to Bill Clinton. Like a thoroughbred watching the race from the sidelines, he is always champing at the bit to get back on the track.

That became clear once again this week when I was invited to interview the 42nd President during the opening session of deficit hawk Peter G. Peterson’s “Solutions for America’s Future” conference.

May 20, 2011

Weekly Show

After infighting between New Gingrich and fellow republicans, the panel examines the current field of GOP candidates. Also, the table reports on campaign fundraising efforts, the scandal rocking the IMF, and the President’s clash with Israel's PM on the path to peace in the Mideast. Joining Gwen: Jeanne Cummings/POLITICO, Michael Duffy/TIME, Doyle McManus/Los Angeles Times, Eamon Javers/CNBC.

 

On the Radar: May 17, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

April 15, 2011

Weekly Show

While President Obama and Rep. Paul Ryan both unveiled plans to cut $4 trillion from the national debt they continue to argue over how to do it. The GOP and Democrats continued to fight over America’s deficit, from taxes to overhauling Medicare and Medicaid.  This week: Susan Davis, National Journal; Jeff Zeleny, New York Times; Janet Hook, Wall Street Journal; John Harwood, CNBC/NY Times.
 

The Bully Pulpit Advantage

Gwen's Take

Budgets, Deficits and 2012

A few weeks ago, I mused in this space about why anyone would want to be President. This week, I had an epiphany. And so did Rep. Paul Ryan.

To understand this, it helps to be a student of the orchestrated political rollout. That’s when an individual carefully plots out in advance what he or she wants the next day’s headline to read – and then pulls it off.