Related Content: payroll tax cut

House Rejects 2-Month Extension of Payroll Tax Cut

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The Republican-controlled House on Tuesday rejected a Senate-approved two-month extension of a payroll tax cut and unemployment benefits to millions of Americans, raising the likelihood that both will expire on Dec. 31.The House effectively adjourned for the year following the vote, and with the Senate out of town for the holiday, there is no resolution in sight on a legislative battle waged by House Republicans over the length of the benefits' extension. Both chambers can return to Washington at the call of party leaders if there is an agreement.

Dems Hope for Campaign Edge on Tax Issue

On The Radar

Democrats feel they’re closer than ever in their long-running bid to paint Republicans as being much more eager to cut taxes for the rich than for the working class. But public contempt for Congress is so rampant that the effort may fade away in a pox-on-all-their-houses fog. If that happens, President Barack Obama and congressional Democrats could lose a political edge as they head into the 2012 elections with a struggling economy.
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Obama Scolds House GOP Over Payroll Tax Stalemate

On The Radar

President Obama turned up the heat on House Republicans Tuesday afternoon, urging them to rethink their opposition to a Senate-approved bill that would extend the payroll tax holiday for at least two more months next year. Shortly after House conservatives voted Tuesday to rebuke the Senate and risk raising the payroll tax in January, the president grabbed his spokesman’s podium to deliver his own message to lawmakers.
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PBS NewsHour: White House, GOP Ratchet Up Rhetoric on 'Responsible' Deal for Payroll Tax Cut

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The way forward on extending the payroll tax cut remained murky Monday as House Republicans vowed to turn back a compromise measure passed by the Senate over the weekend. Gwen Ifill discusses the stalemate with Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Gene Sperling, a senior economic adviser to President Obama.

House GOP Strategy on Senate Payroll Package Still Evolving

On The Radar

If House Republicans have proven anything this year, it’s they are absolutely sure of what they’re against. What they have rarely been sure of, and what eludes them now, is what they are for. What also eludes them at present is a strategy to get what they want once they decide on what they want. This emerged as the key question for House Republicans as they pondered strategy on Monday.

House Speaker Foresees Extension of Payroll Tax Cuts

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House Speaker John Boehner told USA TODAY on Monday that he was optimistic that payroll tax cuts and unemployment benefits would be extended — despite a congressional stalemate that could result in millions of Americans losing both in the new year.
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Obama Professes Satisfaction With Payroll Tax Deal

On The Radar

President Obama triangulated, truncated and equivocated on his way to a pale compromise with lawmakers over the payroll tax. On Saturday, with Senate approval behind him and House action a question mark next week, he professed satisfaction with a result that will benefit 160 million Americans -- for eight weeks in 2012. "I'm glad that both parties in Congress came together," the president declared. "And I want to thank them for ensuring that as we head into the holidays, folks at home don't have to worry about their taxes going up."

Boehner: House Opposes Senate Payroll Tax Bill

On The Radar

The Senate’s two-month payroll tax extension is dead on arrival in the House. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, made that perfectly clear Sunday morning as he said that Congress will have to negotiate a deal closer to the House-passed one-year extension before members leave for the holidays. “Well, it’s pretty clear that I and our members oppose the Senate bill – it’s only for two months,” Boehner said on NBC’s Meet the Press. “If you talk to employers, they talk about the uncertainty. How can you do tax policy for two months?”

Deal on Payroll Tax Cut Extension Still Elusive

On The Radar

There is broad agreement in Congress to extend the payroll tax cut for one year and overhaul the federal unemployment benefit system, but a partisan divide over how to pay for it and whether to fast-track an oil pipeline has threatened Congress' ability to adjourn for the year and reignited the prospect of a government shutdown.
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Obama Vows to Reject Bills Tying Payroll Tax to Pipeline

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President Obama said Wednesday he would oppose any congressional efforts to link extraneous matters to legislation he supports to extend the payroll tax holiday, which is set to expire Dec. 31. Obama's resistance, which he clarified falls short of an actual veto threat, was intended to thwart Republican efforts to mix one of the president's priorities with various but unrelated projects supported by conservatives -- for instance, a proposed oil pipeline that would extend 1,700 miles from Alberta, Canada, through the United States to coastal refineries in Texas.