Related Content: primary

Obama-Romney Race Toss-Up in Poll Showing Independents Critical

On The Radar

A strengthening economy and a contentious Republican primary have not translated into a wave of support for President Barack Obama, who runs even in a matchup against his likely challenger, Mitt Romney. Obama and Romney are backed by 47 percent of likely general election voters, while the president outruns the other Republican candidates, a Bloomberg National Poll conducted March 8-11 shows.
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Home Is Where the Candidate Has to Win

On The Radar

Resolved: It is really, really important for presidential candidates to win their home states. Pride is on the line, obviously, but a loss on native ground begs a legitimate question: If the candidate can’t win here, why should voters believe the candidate can win anywhere else? In 2012, the stakes are even higher than usual because the Republican primary contest is so volatile.
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Mitt Romney Survives Michigan Primary, Looks to Super Tuesday

On The Radar

February was supposed to be Mitt Romney’s month, a time when he could put distance between himself and his rivals for the Republican nomination with a series of contests on generally friendly terrain. Instead it turned into a grinding endurance test far more difficult than anything he or his campaign had imagined.
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Michigan and Arizona: Bruising GOP Primaries Brighten Obama’s Prospects

On The Radar

When President Obama accused Republicans who opposed the auto industry bailout of peddling a “load of you know what,” he might have been describing the residue in Michigan and Arizona for Republicans now that the two primaries are over. Obama is in better shape in both states since the GOP circus came to town, with higher favorable ratings than before and with an elevated profile among key constituencies, like blue-collar voters and women who have new appreciation of his handling of the auto bailouts and the contraception issue.

PBS NewsHour: If Romney Loses Michigan, 'All Bets Are Off'

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Ahead of crucial primaries in Michigan and Arizona, GOP hopeful Mitt Romney focused on federal spending while Rick Santorum said religion should play a wider role in public policy. Gwen Ifill discusses the state of the GOP primary battle with USA Today's Susan Page and The Rothenberg Political Report's Stuart Rothenberg.

I’m One of You! No, Really!

On The Radar

Mitt Romney reminds voters at every campaign stop in Michigan that he is a local boy. He points out school friends, the cemetery where his parents are buried—his father picked the plot because it was the cheapest—and talks about vacations they took in his family’s rambler. In Traverse City on Sunday, he delighted the packed house on how he stole his first kiss from his wife Ann on a beach down the road. It seems to be working.

Tight Race in Michigan

On The Radar

Polls show Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum in a close race for Michigan’s Tuesday primary. Jeff Zeleny reports.
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Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum (CNN)
 

Conventional Wisdom

On The Radar

Disney may be in Orlando, but in Republican Party politics, Tampa is the home of Fantasyland. That's where the GOP convention will be held the week of Aug. 27. As the Republican race appears more likely to stretch into spring (or beyond), journalists and political operatives have started to imagine make-believe scenarios for what might happen if GOP delegates show up with funny hats, pins, and suntan lotion but no confirmed nominee.

What Happens if Mitt Romney Wins Michigan?

On The Radar

For the past week, much of the focus of the Republican presidential race has centered on the consequences Mitt Romney will face if he loses Michigan’s primary. After a debate in Arizona on Wednesday, the question should be: What will happen if he wins his home state? Polls in Michigan show a tight race between Romney and former senator Rick Santorum (Pa.). Romney won Michigan four years ago, but there’s no guarantee he will do so again on Tuesday.

Santorum's Risky Message

On The Radar

As Republican Presidential Candidate Rick Santorum emerges as the new front-runner, his radical brand of conservatism is put on full display. Scott Pelley spoke with CBS News political director John Dickerson on the risk his messages pose in the general election.