Related Content: Reelection

Obama Campaign Team: Primary Race Weakens Romney

On The Radar

War with Iran is lurking, gas prices are rising, twisters are mowing through the heartland, but if Mitt Romney is having a bad day, President Obama's Chicago campaign team is chipper. Even if Romney won six of 10 Super Tuesday contests, the president's top campaign advisers told reporters Wednesday that the former Massachusetts governor -- still the focus of their battle plan -- is a weakened candidate because of his ultra-right policies, his rhetoric, and the negative advertising deployed to help him knock out opponents.

Obama’s Trip West Fills His Campaign’s Coffers

On The Radar

If there were any doubts that President Obama had plunged fully into his re-election campaign, they were erased on Thursday as the president spent an entire day hopscotching some of California’s fanciest neighborhoods in search of dollars to finance his bid for a second term.
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"The Era of Big Government is Over:" Clinton's 1996 State of the Union

Vault Show

In his 1996 reelection, President Clinton’s tried to claim the role as the fiscal responsibility candidate from the Republicans, much like President Obama is trying to do today. In his State of the Union that year, he famously said, "The era of big government is over." Take a look at the Address, a pivotal moment in his reelection campaign. Original air date: January 26, 1996. Moderator: Ken Bode. Panelists: Gloria Borger, US News and World Report; Alan Murray, Wall Street Journal; Todd Purdum, The New York Times; Mara Liasson, NPR.

Clint Eastwood Gives America a Pep Talk

On The Radar

Did the first Obama re-election ad run during the Super Bowl? You might have missed it since the president wasn't even mentioned. It was a Chrysler ad, although even that wasn’t obvious. Instead, more than 111 million viewers were greeted by that tough-talking American icon Clint Eastwood as he delivered what amounted to a locker room speech to the country.
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Obama Yields in Marshaling of ‘Super PAC’

On The Radar

President Obama is signaling to wealthy Democratic donors that he wants them to start contributing to an outside group supporting his re-election, reversing a long-held position as he confronts a deep financial disadvantage on a vital front in the campaign.
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The Flub Watch Never Stops for Obama’s Team

On The Radar

For Brad Woodhouse, the spokesman for the Democratic National Committee, it was when he came across a Twitter post about a CNN interview in which Mitt Romney seemed to shrug off concern for the very poor. And Bill Burton’s moment came a week and a half ago while he was in his family room watching Mr. Romney take Newt Gingrich to task for talking about putting a colony on the moon. If someone made such a proposal to him, Mr. Romney said, “I’d say, ‘You’re fired.’ ”

With Campaign Season Here, Obama Shows Some Swagger

On The Radar

He's confronting Republicans in the House chamber and on a sunny tarmac in front of the cameras. He's singing Al Green and busting out corny jokes. He's trying out his Spanish and taking off the necktie. It looks like the sometimes-aloof, overly cerebral President Obama has gotten some of his mojo back.
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Obama Returns to Familiar Theme in Case for 2nd Term

On The Radar

President Obama’s election-year State of the Union address on Tuesday echoed a theme that has run through his career: Government and citizens are responsible together for the common good, even as they celebrate individualism and free markets.
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Obama’s Message Put to Test Where Voters Struggle

On The Radar

President Barack Obama is testing his populist message on a trip through five electoral battleground states where he is trying to persuade voters to stick with him even as their economic prospects remain clouded. From the rescue of the U.S. auto industry to the housing crisis, Iowa, Arizona, Nevada, Colorado and Michigan showcase the challenges on Obama’s path to re-election.
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Frank Won't Seek Re-Election

On The Radar

Rep. Barney Frank (D., Mass.), an architect of last year's landmark financial-regulation overhaul, said Monday he wouldn't seek a 17th term, adding to a list of Democratic retirements that could hurt the party's already slim chances of retaking the House next year. The decision to leave Congress by Mr. Frank, the most high-profile Democrat to do so since 2010, will deprive liberals of one of their most outspoken champions and conservatives of a national political lightning rod.