Related Content: Republican

From the Vault: President Obama visits Capitol Hill

Vault Show

As President Obama travels to Capitol Hill to meet with Republicans and Democrats to negotiate a budget compromise, we look in our Vault to 2009 when the president headed to the Hill only a week after his inauguration.  With the Senate and House both controlled by Democrats, the president met with Republicans to garner bipartisan support for the $787 billion economic stimulus package.  The House passed the bill without any Republican support the next day.  On our January 30, 2009 show, Alexis Simendinger and John Dickerson talked about the effort at bipartisanship.

Florida Governor's Embrace of Medicaid Money Undercuts GOP Attacks on 'Obamacare'

Essential Reads

Bashing “Obamacare” just isn’t what it used to be.

Just over two years ago, the rallying cry against President Obama’s health care overhaul unified Republicans and hoisted the party to historic electoral gains in state capitals and in Washington.

A More Perfect Poll

Essential Reads

In the 2012 presidential election, we all thought we were smarter than the pollsters. Conservatives flocked to a site called UnskewedPolls.com, whose proprietor reconstituted the polls of major media organizations in proportions better suited to his vision of the American electorate—that is, one with more Republicans in it. Liberals, for their part, elevated to demigod status the statistician and New York Times blogger Nate Silver, who poured those same polls into a meat grinder and produced a neatly encased pronouncement that Barack Obama was overwhelmingly likely to win.

November 30, 2012

Weekly Show

Fiscal cliff negotiations between Congress and the White House have reached a standstill as both sides clash over spending cuts and tax increases. Also, the potential nomination of Susan Rice to succeed Hillary Clinton as Secretary of State has left Obama and Republicans at a political stalemate.  Joining Gwen: Gloria Borger, CNN; Michael Viqueira, NBC News; Susan Davis, USA Today.

 

Vice presidential debate could be a tale of two Ryans

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Republican Congressman Paul Ryan is a changed man. Presidential candidate Mitt Romney's running mate made a name for himself as a bold fiscal crusader, willing to make big, unpopular cuts to entitlements to get U.S. finances in order.

Two conventions tell the tale of 2012

Essential Reads

Republicans last week in Tampa and Democrats this week in Charlotte were not faking it. Partisans on both sides really do regard the other party’s nominee with contempt, and both sides look at the other’s agenda with genuine incomprehension.

Dispatches From the Republican National Convention

Essential Reads

Paul Ryan is supposed to be a wonk, but we've never really seen this side of him since he's become a vice presidential candidate. So far he has been an articulate Republican Party spokesperson for all of Barack Obama's failings. He hit his rhetorical height Wednesday night at the Republican convention when he unbuckled a long and stinging critique of the Obama administration and the Democratic Party. It was powerful, well received, and passionately delivered. The speech didn't require policy expertise, particularly.

Paul Ryan promises GOP ‘won’t duck the tough issues’

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Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin accepted the GOP nomination for vice president on Wednesday with a declaration that President Obama, who was elected four years ago on a promise of hope and change, has failed and his opportunity has been squandered.

Romney clinches GOP nomination at convention; Ann Romney, Chris Christie speak

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The Republican Party on Tuesday formally bestowed its presidential nomination on former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, launching its convention here with two goals: to make the GOP contender more appealing and to sharpen the case against giving President Obama a second term.

Ann Romney in charge of conveying Mitt's warm and fuzzy side

Essential Reads

While Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s running mate is dominating the run-up to the Republican convention, the woman he chose as his life partner could matter much more to the ticket’s success. Romney’s choice of Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., thrills conservative Republicans, but those voters are not the presumptive nominee’s biggest problem. His biggest problem is that regular voters don’t like him as much as Obama. That's especially true of women, and that’s why the stakes are high for Ann Romney’s speech on the crucial opening night of the convention.