Related Content: Republican

Democrats See a Two-Horse G.O.P. Race, Adding a Whip

On The Radar

The White House and its allies are starting to turn their sights to Newt Gingrich, invoking his tumultuous history as House speaker to brand him as the “godfather of gridlock,” a testament to his new viability and the sudden realization that he could be President Obama’s Republican opponent.

Obama Vows to Reject Bills Tying Payroll Tax to Pipeline

On The Radar

President Obama said Wednesday he would oppose any congressional efforts to link extraneous matters to legislation he supports to extend the payroll tax holiday, which is set to expire Dec. 31. Obama's resistance, which he clarified falls short of an actual veto threat, was intended to thwart Republican efforts to mix one of the president's priorities with various but unrelated projects supported by conservatives -- for instance, a proposed oil pipeline that would extend 1,700 miles from Alberta, Canada, through the United States to coastal refineries in Texas.

Newt by Proxy

On The Radar

In 1995, then-House Speaker Newt Gingrich banned proxy votes in committees. That meant no longer could powerful chairmen (for 40 years previous, all Democrats) cast votes for lawmakers who skipped out on the marking-up of legislation. This is ironic because the reason Gingrich is the Republican presidential front-runner today is that several big-name Republicans essentially cast their proxy vote for him.

Allies Urge Romney to Mix it up More in Campaign

On The Radar

Mitt Romney's above-the-fray campaign style kept him atop the Republican presidential field for months. But it's raising concerns now that Newt Gingrich has moved up to challenge him.

Fight Shapes Up for Senate GOP Leadership Slot

On The Radar

Sen. Roy Blunt (R., Mo.) just announced he’s running for a Senate Republican leadership post, taking on Sen. Ron Johnson (R., Wis.) in what many lawmakers see as a contest between a traditionalist elder statesman and an insurgent newcomer. At the same time, GOP leaders have moved up the election from January to next Tuesday, so the race will be quick and high-intensity. The leadership vacancy was triggered when Sen.

In Iowa, Gingrich Is Gaining Favor, New Poll Shows

On The Radar

Newt Gingrich enters the final four weeks of campaigning before the Iowa caucuses with Republican voters in the state viewing him as more prepared to be president than Mitt Romney, more attuned to their concerns and just as capable of defeating President Obama, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll.

Gingrich Surges Ahead in Iowa

On The Radar

A month before the Republican nominating contest opens here, former Speaker Newt Gingrich holds a substantial lead among voters who say they are likely to participate in the Iowa caucuses, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News poll. Mr. Gingrich, whose presidential candidacy has steadily surged in recent weeks after a series of televised debates, won the support of 31 percent of Republicans and independents who say they will definitely or probably attend the Iowa caucuses on Jan. 3.

Republican Romney to Skip Trump Debate

On The Radar

U.S. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney said on Tuesday that he will not attend a controversial Dec. 27 debate to be moderated by real estate magnate Donald Trump, as have candidates Ron Paul and former Utah Governor Jon Huntsman. Romney told Fox News' Neil Cavuto that he will not participate in the Iowa debate, which has drawn fire from Washington Republicans as well as two of Romney's competitors.
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Gingrich Emerges as Clear Front-Runner in Iowa

On The Radar

Propelled by his debate performances and the demise of Herman Cain’s candidacy, former House speaker Newt Gingrich sits atop the Republican presidential field in Iowa with a clear lead over his closest competitors, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll. Gingrich, according to the survey, has advantages that extend well beyond the horse race that put him in an enviable position in the final weeks before the state’s Jan. 3 caucuses, which serve as the formal start of the long nominating season.

More Like Reagan?

On The Radar

Conservatives prize constancy above all else, but if Republicans are really faced with a choice between Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney, this will be a nomination defined by reversals. Nominating Gingrich will require conservatives to embrace a sweeping ideological reversal. Nominating Romney will require Republicans to embrace a candidate who is defined by personal reversals.
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