Related Content: Rick Santorum

Will Toxic GOP Governors Infect Romney?

Essential Reads

Florida Gov. Rick Scott didn't endorse Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney until last month, after rival Rick Santorum dropped out. It was a tardy and lackluster show of support. "Mitt Romney will be our party's nominee, and it is critical that all Republicans coalesce," Scott said in a written statement, as if forced to acknowledge the inevitable, like it or not. The two former corporate executives, who could probably spend all day swapping success stories, have never campaigned together.

When’s a Campaign Not a Campaign? (See Obama, Gingrich)

Gwen's Take

Just when you thought it was safe to go back outside, it turns out the campaign lull we thought had just begun hasn’t occurred at all.

We were assured by the Democrats that the president’s travels to three battleground states this week were absolutely, positively, not about politics. Ignore those arenas full of students shouting “Four more years.” This was all about policy, they insisted.

The Curse of the Political Surrogate: When Silence Should Be Golden

Gwen's Take

It took the 2012 presidential campaign to throw Democrat Hilary Rosen and conservative Ted Nugent into the same sentence.

Rosen made more of a splash last week than she ever did in 17 years at the powerful Recording Industry Association of America, including five years as chief executive officer.

And Nugent, revered mostly among those who know how to hum “Cat Scratch Fever,” was suddenly on the lips of every politico in Washington.

April 13, 2012

Weekly Show

With Rick Santorum out of the GOP race, Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama are gearing up for the general election. But recent comments about Romney's wife, Ann, have caused controversy over gender politics. Plus, a look at the fragile ceasefire in Syria. Joining Gwen: Dan Balz, Washington Post; Beth Reinhard, National Journal; John Harris, POLITICO; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times.

 

With Rick Santorum Out of GOP Presidential Race, Mitt Romney Shifts Focus to Obama

On The Radar

Rick Santorum’s decision to suspend his presidential campaign Tuesday effectively ended the race for the Republican nomination, giving likely nominee Mitt Romney the opportunity to repair the damage he sustained in the primary contests, rally reluctant conservatives behind his candidacy and shift his focus to President Obama.
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Game Over

On The Radar

Over to you, Governor Romney. Rick Santorum has left the Republican presidential race, ending the most successful run by an improbable GOP candidate since publisher Steve Forbes' run in 1996. At the start of the presidential campaign, few in political circles would have predicted that a senator who had lost his last race by 17 points, who had no money, no pollster, and few endorsements, would win 11 contests.
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Rick Santorum to Drop Out of the Presidential Race

On The Radar

Rick Santorum announced Tuesday that he is suspending his presidential campaign, all but bringing to a close the 2012 GOP presidential contest and effectively handing the nomination to Mitt Romney. “We made a decision over the weekend that, while this presidential race for us is over — for me — and we will suspend our campaign effective today, we are not done fighting,” Santorum said at a campaign event in Gettysburg, Pa., the site of the historic and pivotal Civil War battle.

April 6, 2012

Weekly Show

After three big wins Mitt Romney has scored more than half of the delegates needed for the GOP presidential nomination. Plus, new unemployment numbers shed light on the economy. Also, female voters, the President’s Supreme Court remarks and more. Joining Gwen: John Dickerson, Slate Magazine/CBS News; Karen Tumulty, Washington Post; Jackie Calmes, New York Times; David Wessel, Wall Street Journal.

 

Under Pressure, Santorum Huddles with Conservatives

On The Radar

Tumbling in the polls and under increasing pressure to abandon his White House campaign, Republican Rick Santorum huddled with conservative leaders and aides on Thursday to plot strategy. Among the options on the table: a plan that would involve Newt Gingrich dropping out of the Republican race and backing Santorum in a late effort to unite conservatives and prevent Mitt Romney from clinching the party's presidential nomination.
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After a Rollicking Primary, a Different Kind of Fight in November

On The Radar

If anything is stable in this presidential race, it is the idea that 2012 is a volatile campaign year. In part that reflects the last two elections, when Democrats and Republicans in turn won big victories, and the expectation that November represents a tiebreaker. Even more, it reflects a roller coaster Republican primary campaign, which at different moments has elevated Michele Bachmann, Rick Perry, Herman Cain, Newt Gingrich, Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney.