Related Content: Rick Santorum

Romney’s Rivals Have Scant Hope of Closing the Delegate Gap

On The Radar

Though Mitt Romney’s opponents continue to insist there is a road to the Republican presidential nomination for them after the Super Tuesday contests, the arithmetic suggests otherwise. How long it will take for the other contenders and their supporters to figure that out — and to make peace with it — is another question.
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With No Knockout Punch, a Bruising Battle Plods On

On The Radar

Mitt Romney won the delegates, but not necessarily the argument. His quest to win the Republican presidential nomination has always resembled a detailed, methodical business plan. Mr. Romney, who spent much of his life fixing troubled corporations, must now decide whether steps are necessary to repair his lethargic candidacy.
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How Santorum Became the GOP’s Rocky Balboa

On The Radar

I am my campaign. That was Rick Santorum's message at the Dayton Christian School in Miamisburg, Ohio, the day before Super Tuesday. The former Pennsylvania senator recounted how pundits had sniffed at him and how he'd been down in the polls for so long. But he slogged on, as he does today, even though he says he's being outspent 12-to-1 in this key battleground state. Only someone who could muscle through so much adversity can beat Barack Obama, he tells the crowds.

Candidates Hammer Obama Over Iran, but Approaches Differ Little

On The Radar

To rein in Tehran’s nuclear ambitions, Mitt Romney says he would conduct naval exercises in the Persian Gulf to remind Iran of American military might. He would try to ratchet up Security Council sanctions on Iran, targeting its Revolutionary Guards, and the country’s central bank and other financial institutions. And if Russia and China do not go along, he says, the United States should team up with other willing governments to put such punitive measures in place.

Santorum and Romney Court Blue-Collar Voters in Ohio

On The Radar

If Mitt Romney defeats Rick Santorum in the bellwether primary here on Tuesday, it will be in no small part because he managed to win over one of the most hotly contested and elusive segments of the electorate: white working-class voters. At a metal works in Canton and a welding factory in Youngstown, in mailboxes and on the radio, Mr.

Two Sets of GOP Voters: Rationals and Notionals

On The Radar

There is a way to think about the up-and-down GOP nomination fight that at least partially explains its volatility and the seemingly endless array of short-lived challengers to front-runner Mitt Romney as well as Romney's surprising resilience. It's been the battle between the rationals and the notionals.
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PBS NewsHour: Political Checklist: It's 'Down to the Wire' in Ohio for Super Tuesday

Web content

NewsHour Political Editor Christina Bellantoni speaks with senior correspondents Judy Woodruff and Gwen Ifill about the most important prizes in the Super Tuesday contests.

5 Things to Watch For On Super Tuesday

Gwen's Take

At the end of a long evening of introductions and speeches, President Clinton used to like to say that everything had been said, but everyone had not yet said it.

If you follow politics, you already may have read all the pre-game analysis you can stand in advance of the pivotal Super Tuesday primaries.

What? You say you haven’t? Then, please allow me.

Before Super Tuesday, Big Names Rally to Romney

On The Radar

A reluctant Republican Party is increasingly showing signs of rallying around Mitt Romney in the presidential race, with leading members of Congress and influential conservatives signaling that a coast-to-coast burst of voting on Super Tuesday should mark a moment to start concentrating on defeating President Obama.
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March 2, 2012

Weekly Show

 As we head into Super Tuesday, which GOP candidate has momentum and how will Tuesday’s primaries change the race? Meanwhile, President Obama makes campaign-like speeches in Michigan and New York. Also, Senator Olympia Snow resigns, saying there is no longer bipartisanship in Congress. Joining Gwen: John Dickerson, Slate/CBS News; Gloria Borger, CNN; Charles Babington, Associated Press.