Related Content: Ron Paul

PBS NewsHour: Sen. Marco Rubio- Voters Will Choose Between Two Visions of Government, Economy

Web content

Gwen Ifill talks to Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, a rising leader of the Republican party, about his role at the convention, his belief that voters should approach this election as a choice between two different visions of government and economy, and his emphasis on encouraging legal immigration.

Convention Challenge: VIP Speakers Who Send Wrong Message

Essential Reads

Pity the organizers of the Democratic and Republican conventions this year. The host governors -- Bev Perdue in North Carolina and Rick Scott in Florida --happen to be two of the least popular state executives in the country. But geographic protocols demand that they address the convention hall. What to do?

When’s a Campaign Not a Campaign? (See Obama, Gingrich)

Gwen's Take

Just when you thought it was safe to go back outside, it turns out the campaign lull we thought had just begun hasn’t occurred at all.

We were assured by the Democrats that the president’s travels to three battleground states this week were absolutely, positively, not about politics. Ignore those arenas full of students shouting “Four more years.” This was all about policy, they insisted.

Cost-Per-Delegate Madness: Paul Spent $496,000

On The Radar

In honor of budget week and Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., endorsing GOP front-runner Mitt Romney, I decided to run some numbers. Not budget numbers, everyone has done that this week. These are numbers on what's been spent for the two most important commodities in a nominating contest: votes and delegates. And if Supreme Court justices can be cheeky and snarky in oral arguments, why can't I be a bit cheeky at this stage of the GOP primary?
Read More on National Journal

PBS NewsHour: Wisconsin's Primary - Setting the Stakes for Romney, Santorum

Web content

With endorsements from Rep. Paul Ryan and Sen. Ron Johnson, Mitt Romney campaigned exclusively in Wisconsin Monday where 42 delegates are at stake in Tuesday's Republican primary. Gwen Ifill, USA Today's Susan Page and The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel's Craig Gilbert outline the stakes for the Badger State's primary.

Voice of the Voters: Maryland Youth

Web content

Maryland’s state legislature and governor legalized same-sex marriage this year. How is the issue resonating with young voters as the Republican presidential candidates campaign ahead of tomorrow's presidential primary in the state? What role do they think government plays in the issue? University of Maryland student Jamie Forzato reports.

Voice of the Voters: Wisconsin Youth

Web content

 

As the nation focuses on the republican presidential primary in Wisconsin tomorrow, and as Republican Governor Scott Walker’s recall election heats up, University of Wisconsin students discuss whether political advertisements have an impact on voters, especially younger voters. Are the Presidential hopefuls’ messages getting through? Kate Chappell of the University of Wisconsin – Madison reports.

Why Ron Paul Draws Big Crowds but Fails to Catch on

On The Radar

At first glance, Benjamin Stolz would appear to be the perfect prize for Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul. Stolz, a freshman at the University of Maryland, agrees wholeheartedly with Paul on a range of issues — from seeing foreign intervention as too costly to agreeing that government spending should be cut. Stolz, an enthusiastic 18-year-old who has never voted, also admires Paul’s frankness and the Texas congressman’s ability to draw diverse crowds.

GOPs Campaign in Louisiana

On The Radar

CNBC's John Harwood has the story on GOP hopefuls gearing up for the Louisiana primary as some are calling for candidates to drop out.

Politics By The Numbers: Countdown to Chaos

Gwen's Take

Almost every Tuesday night this year, political junkies everywhere have gathered by the flickering light of their computer screens. We have pored over exit polls, tallied the minutes until results came in from Vermont to Hawaii and crunched delegate allocations.

Invariably, we wake Wednesday morning at least as confused as we were the day before.