Related Content: Ron Paul

Political Landscape: Ohio

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Of the states holding primaries on Super Tuesday, among most closely watched is Ohio. Ohio has 66 of the 419 delegates awarded next week and has seen a slew of negative advertising by candidates and Super PACs. Rick Santorum is leading in the polls, but Mitt Romney has scored some key endorsements from local politicians. Karen Kasler of Ohio Public Television previews the primary.


Cover photo: FlickrCC/Tim Balogh

PBS NewsHour: Deconstructing a Republican Hopeful's Road to 1,144 Delegates

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The Republican Party's eventual nominee needs to secure 1,144 delegates. With wins in Michigan and Arizona Wednesday, Mitt Romney leads the GOP field with 135. Gwen Ifill discusses Super Tuesday, when a sizable 419 delegates are at stake, with Political Editor Christina Bellantoni and Frontloading HQ's Josh Putnam.

Revenge of the 'super PACs'

On The Radar

Chalk up another win for the law of unintended consequences. When federal courts ruled in 2010 against restricting donations to political action committees, Republican strategists rejoiced. Here, they thought, was a way for the GOP's deep-pocketed donors to gain an advantage over President Obama's fundraising machine. But look what happened. "Super PACs," as the newly empowered political action committees are known, have mutated like election-year Godzillas, wreaking havoc in an increasingly bloody Republican primary campaign.

Taking the 2012 Authenticity Test

Gwen's Take

PHOENIX -- If there is one reliable source of applause to be found along the Republican primary trail this year, it is ignited by candidates who boast of being able to speak without a Teleprompter.

The speech delivery device used by presidents, candidates, dinner emcees and, yes, television news anchors, has become an object of extended mockery wherever Republican politics is practiced. (Full disclosure: I use them on almost a daily basis. I love them.)

Out of Air in Arizona

On The Radar

he 20th and perhaps final Republican presidential debate wheezed across the finish line and collapsed. At times it felt like the candidates had already talked themselves out on the big themes and could only bicker over table scraps. There was a long symposium on how earmarks and the congressional appropriating process work. Then, there was a confusing discussion of Arlen Specter, his re-election, and the judiciary committee. Who won? Ask the undecided Republicans in Michigan.

Mitt Romney Attacks Put Rick Santorum on Defensive in GOP Presidential Debate

On The Radar

Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum was thrown on the defensive here Wednesday night as rival Mitt Romney attacked the former senator over spending and earmarks and accused him of compiling an inconsistent and contradictory record. In the first GOP debate since he won a trio of states two weeks ago, Santorum fired back, accusing Romney of his own inconsistencies, but he struggled under repeated criticism to explain his record. The squabbling became so intense at times that the two talked past each other, with voices raised, each trying to gain the upper hand.

February 10, 2012

Weekly Show

President Barack Obama modified a controversial mandate on birth control access. But could there be lingering political fallout? Plus, did Rick Santorum’s big wins this week change the GOP presidential race? And a decision on California’s same-sex marriage ban. Joining Gwen: Pete Williams, NBC News; John Dickerson, Slate & CBS News; Nia-Malika Henderson, The Washington Post; Beth Reinhard, National Journal.

PBS NewsHour Special Report: Sorting Through Florida Results

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Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks sort through the Florida GOP primary results with Gwen in a special edition of the NewsHour.

5 Things To Watch For In Florida

Gwen's Take

For some reason in modern politics, it always seems to come down to Florida. It is an irresistible destination. The northern panhandle is a sweet piece of the South. The I-4 corridor---where half the state's registered Republican voters live---slashes the state in half east to west, along the way connecting the two huge media markets of Tampa and Orlando. The east and west coasts are home to vast swaths of northeastern retirees, including a robust and engaged Jewish population.

Republicans Put Their Family Feud on Display

On The Radar

"Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way." With apologies to Leo Tolstoy, his masterpiece "Anna Karenina" -- and its opening line -- comes to mind when spending some time with the GOP field. They're an unhappy brood all right -- dissatisfied with President Barack Obama, with the economy, with what they consider overregulation, with deficits, with big government, with the tax code.
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