Related Content: Sandy Hook

What’s Changed in the Fight for New Gun Laws

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Gun-control groups scored modest public relations victories last week as they engaged senators of both parties who voted against a bipartisan plan to expand the national gun background-check system. Activists pushed senators to explain their votes in public settings in their home states, part of a new campaign to keep the issue of gun-control alive as long as necessary — which could mean the midterm elections in 2014.

Gwen’s Take: Seeing Eye to Eye for a Change

Gwen's Take

Washington lives in its moments.

I got to sit in the White House East Room this week for the taping of an “In Performance at the White House” concert on Memphis Soul that will air on PBS next week. Justin Timberlake and Mavis Staples were there. I was in hog heaven.

Sandy Hook and the Politics of Pain

Gwen's Take

I think it's fair to say we have all been crying for a week.

Watching the faces of the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting scroll by, in silence, at the end of the PBS NewsHour on Monday night was excruciating.

I tried to escape by Christmas shopping. Cashiers asked me what the shooter's mother was thinking.

PBS Newshour: President Obama Declares Gun Control Will Be a 'Central Issue' of Second Term

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The White House stepped up its response to Sandy Hook by planning to give Congress recommendations on preventing mass shootings, from mental health services to gun control laws. Gwen Ifill talks to Gov. Pat Quinn, D-Ill., who is pushing for statewide bans in Illinois on assault weapons and high capacity ammunition magazines.

 

New Calls for Gun Limits

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Several lawmakers Sunday called for reintroducing a ban on assault weapons in the wake of Friday's deadly school rampage. President Barack Obama is also likely to propose gun-policy changes, according to two administration officials.

PBS Special: After Newtown

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After Newtown, Will Obama Take Cue From Clinton?

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More than 14 years ago, President Clinton told a roomful of interested parties at the White House, “We have to help schools recognize the early warning signs of violence and to respond to violence when it does strike.”