Related Content: SCOTUS

Most Oppose at Least Part of Overhaul, Poll Finds

On The Radar

Two-thirds of Americans want the Supreme Court to overturn some or all of the health care law, even though large majorities support a few of its major aspects, according to a poll by The New York Times and CBS News. At the heart of the opposition is the individual mandate requiring Americans to obtain health insurance, the least popular part of the bill and a crucial piece at the center of the court arguments, which began Monday and will turn to the mandate on Tuesday.

PBS NewsHour: Supreme Court Considers Health Reform; Day 1 Recap: Jurisdiction, Tax Questions

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Demonstrators gathered Monday outside the Supreme Court as justices kicked off three days of hearings on the health care reform law. Betty Ann Bowser reports then Marcia Coyle and Susan Dentzer discuss the day's proceedings and the core issues of the day's arguments with Gwen Ifill.

Supreme Court Unlikely to Delay Obama Healthcare Ruling

On The Radar

The Supreme Court on Monday appeared prepared to decide the fate of President Barack Obama's sweeping healthcare law soon, rather than delaying for years a ruling on the mandate that Americans buy insurance or pay a penalty.
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Supreme Court Hears Historic Healthcare Law

On The Radar

President Barack Obama's sweeping healthcare overhaul on Monday went before the U.S. Supreme Court where the nine justices began hearing arguments in a historic test of the law's validity under the U.S. Constitution. The sweeping law intended to transform healthcare for millions of people in the United States has generated fierce political debate. Republican presidential hopefuls and members of Congress have vowed to roll back the March 23, 2010, law they say will financially burden states, businesses and individuals.

Why Supreme Court may uphold healthcare law

On The Radar

Conventional political wisdom holds that the Supreme Court, scheduled to hear a challenge to President Barack Obama's healthcare law beginning on Monday, is likely to strike it down on partisan lines. The court's Republican appointees enjoy a 5-4 majority. But a review of lower court rulings by conservative judges, subtle signals from individual justices, and interviews with professors and judges across the ideological spectrum suggest that presumption is wrong - and that the court will uphold the law.

PBS NewsHour: Supreme Court Weighs Life Without Parole for Juvenile Murder Convicts

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The Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday on whether 14-year-olds convicted of murder should be required to spend life in prison without the possibility of parole. Gwen Ifill and The National Law Journal's Marcia Coyle discuss the arguments and the issues under consideration.

Tracking Suspects via GPS

On The Radar

Supreme Court rules warrant needed for GPS tracking

On The Radar

In a major decision on privacy in the digital age, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that police need a warrant before attaching a GPS device to a person's car. The ruling, which marked the justices' first-ever review of GPS tracking, was unanimous. The justices divided, however, on how the Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable searches and seizures applies to such high-tech tracking.

States Enacting Immigration-Related Laws

On The Radar

The Supreme Court's move to take up a dispute on a stringent new Arizona immigration law sets the scene for a national battle over how to stop foreigners from illegally crossing the border and offers the justices another potentially blockbuster case for the term.
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PBS NewsHour: Supreme Court Lines up Potentially 'Explosive' Election Year Docket

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Supreme Court justices agreed Monday to take up a tough immigration law from Arizona that would, among other things, punish illegal immigrants who apply for work in the state. Gwen Ifill discuses this and other controversial cases with the National Law Journal's Marcia Coyle and author Jeff Shesol.