Related Content: super tuesday

March 9, 2012

Weekly Show

Mitt Romney won big on Super Tuesday, giving him more than 35% of the delegates needed to clinch the nomination. But Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich, and Ron Paul stay defiant, continuing their campaigns as the race focuses on Mississippi and Alabama next Tuesday. What's next? Joining Gwen: Jeff Zeleny, New York Times; Beth Reinhard, National Journal; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times.

 

Answering Those Super Tuesday Questions

Gwen's Take

Remember those five things we asked you to watch Tuesday night? It turns out the voters decided to raise more questions than even we had.

But here are the things we were watching for:

PBS NewsHour: With Romney Leading and No End in Sight, GOP Campaigns Carry on

Web content

Despite winning six states, Mitt Romney's Super Tuesday victories did little to winnow the GOP field. Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul picked up some delegates and continued campaigning ahead of more caucuses and primaries. Gwen talks to Trey Grayson of Harvard University, USA Today's Susan Page and the Pew Research Center's Andrew Kohut about the race.

Romney’s Rivals Have Scant Hope of Closing the Delegate Gap

On The Radar

Though Mitt Romney’s opponents continue to insist there is a road to the Republican presidential nomination for them after the Super Tuesday contests, the arithmetic suggests otherwise. How long it will take for the other contenders and their supporters to figure that out — and to make peace with it — is another question.
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With No Knockout Punch, a Bruising Battle Plods On

On The Radar

Mitt Romney won the delegates, but not necessarily the argument. His quest to win the Republican presidential nomination has always resembled a detailed, methodical business plan. Mr. Romney, who spent much of his life fixing troubled corporations, must now decide whether steps are necessary to repair his lethargic candidacy.
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PBS NewsHour: Political Checklist: It's 'Down to the Wire' in Ohio for Super Tuesday

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NewsHour Political Editor Christina Bellantoni speaks with senior correspondents Judy Woodruff and Gwen Ifill about the most important prizes in the Super Tuesday contests.

Mitt Romney's Super Tuesday Push

On The Radar

CNBC's John Harwood has the update on the candidates poll results and the whether or not GOP candidate Mitt Romney, in the lead with 38 percent, can win the nomination.

March 2, 2012

Weekly Show

 As we head into Super Tuesday, which GOP candidate has momentum and how will Tuesday’s primaries change the race? Meanwhile, President Obama makes campaign-like speeches in Michigan and New York. Also, Senator Olympia Snow resigns, saying there is no longer bipartisanship in Congress. Joining Gwen: John Dickerson, Slate/CBS News; Gloria Borger, CNN; Charles Babington, Associated Press.

 

10 Questions With Rick Santorum

On The Radar

After losses in Arizona and Michigan, the Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum seeks new momentum for next week’s Super Tuesday contests. Mr. Santorum, the former Pennsylvania senator, aims to move beyond controversies over his views on social issues and emphasize economic proposals — including his signature idea of eliminating corporate taxes for manufacturing firms.
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Mitt Romney Survives Michigan Primary, Looks to Super Tuesday

On The Radar

February was supposed to be Mitt Romney’s month, a time when he could put distance between himself and his rivals for the Republican nomination with a series of contests on generally friendly terrain. Instead it turned into a grinding endurance test far more difficult than anything he or his campaign had imagined.
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