Related Content: Tea Party

Sen. Richard Lugar Defeated in Indiana's GOP Primary

Essential Reads

Sen. Richard Lugar of Indiana lost his re-election bid in the state's Republican primary Tuesday, ending the 36-year career of a GOP elder statesman and handing the Tea Party movement its biggest upset victory so far in the 2012 elections. Lugar was ousted by state Treasurer Richard Mourdock, whose campaign against Lugar was backed by conservative groups including the Tea Party Express, the anti-tax Club for Growth, the National Rifle Association and the Tea Party-aligned Freedom Works, and by former Republican Alaska governor Sarah Palin.

Does the Tea Party Have a Second Act?

On The Radar

Tough challenges to Republican Sens. Orrin Hatch and Richard Lugar will signal whether tea-party activists and their allies still have the power they wielded in 2010. Naftali Bendavid has details on The News Hub.

Gingrich Wins Means Grueling GOP Fight

On The Radar

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich has taken a giant step toward becoming the Republican alternative to Mitt Romney that tea partyers and social conservatives have been seeking for months. Gingrich's come-from-behind victory Saturday in the South Carolina primary snatched away the quick and easy way for the GOP to pick its presidential nominee.
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Five Things to Watch for in South Carolina

Gwen's Take

COLUMBIA, S.C. - This has probably been the single craziest week of the 2012 campaign, as candidates rose and fell nearly every single day.

As the voters here head to the polls for an unusual Saturday Republican party primary, here’s what I am watching for.

Is the Tea Party Over?

On The Radar

A year ago, the tea party movement looked like an irresistible wave sweeping through the Republican Party. Anyone who hoped to win this year's GOP presidential nomination, it seemed, would need to embrace tea party activists' stringent demands for smaller government, lower taxes and deep cuts in spending. But in Tuesday's Iowa caucuses, the three candidates who hewed closest to the tea party line — Michele Bachmann, Rick Perry and Newt Gingrich — sank straight to the bottom of the pack.

Iowa Vote Doesn't Resolve GOP Search for Identity

On The Radar

The Republicans' identity crisis is producing the most volatile presidential primary season in memory and threatening to dilute the conservative fervor that swept the party to huge wins in 2010. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is the pragmatic, establishment choice. But he has yet to attract more than a quarter of GOP voters, as his eight-vote Iowa caucus win showed.
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Why Tea Party Freshmen Caved on Payroll Tax Deal

On The Radar

Conservative Tea Party-affiliated lawmakers spent weeks vowing to oppose the short-term compromise bill extending payroll tax cuts and unemployment insurance. But in the end, the bill glided through the House, just before Christmas. The final moments of this latest congressional showdown were fascinating not because of what happened but because of what didn't happen.
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The Endless GOP Audition for President

On The Radar

It's an audition without end, because the Republicans still can't figure out how to cast the lead role. Here's how the internal discussion goes: We need someone who is a true conservative. We need someone who is right on the matters we care about -- the deficit, immigration, cultural issues. We need someone we can trust, who won't betray us. And, by the way, we also need someone who can win.

In Colorado, voter anger clouds 2012 choices

On The Radar

By almost every electoral scenario, the road to the White House in 2012 will run directly through Colorado and a handful of other Rocky Mountain states. Right now, neither President Obama, who will visit here early this week, nor the Republicans who debated in Las Vegas last week should feel confident about their prospects in this pivotal region.

Romney's rise challenges tea party's clout in GOP

On The Radar

Mitt Romney's early success in the Republican presidential race is challenging the tea party's clout. Will it continue to pull the GOP sharply right? Will it slowly fade? Or merge with mainstream Republican elements in a nod to pragmatism, something it's hardly known for?  Read more