Related Content: Tea Party

Is the Tea Party Over?

On The Radar

A year ago, the tea party movement looked like an irresistible wave sweeping through the Republican Party. Anyone who hoped to win this year's GOP presidential nomination, it seemed, would need to embrace tea party activists' stringent demands for smaller government, lower taxes and deep cuts in spending. But in Tuesday's Iowa caucuses, the three candidates who hewed closest to the tea party line — Michele Bachmann, Rick Perry and Newt Gingrich — sank straight to the bottom of the pack.

Iowa Vote Doesn't Resolve GOP Search for Identity

On The Radar

The Republicans' identity crisis is producing the most volatile presidential primary season in memory and threatening to dilute the conservative fervor that swept the party to huge wins in 2010. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is the pragmatic, establishment choice. But he has yet to attract more than a quarter of GOP voters, as his eight-vote Iowa caucus win showed.
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Why Tea Party Freshmen Caved on Payroll Tax Deal

On The Radar

Conservative Tea Party-affiliated lawmakers spent weeks vowing to oppose the short-term compromise bill extending payroll tax cuts and unemployment insurance. But in the end, the bill glided through the House, just before Christmas. The final moments of this latest congressional showdown were fascinating not because of what happened but because of what didn't happen.
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The Endless GOP Audition for President

On The Radar

It's an audition without end, because the Republicans still can't figure out how to cast the lead role. Here's how the internal discussion goes: We need someone who is a true conservative. We need someone who is right on the matters we care about -- the deficit, immigration, cultural issues. We need someone we can trust, who won't betray us. And, by the way, we also need someone who can win.

In Colorado, voter anger clouds 2012 choices

On The Radar

By almost every electoral scenario, the road to the White House in 2012 will run directly through Colorado and a handful of other Rocky Mountain states. Right now, neither President Obama, who will visit here early this week, nor the Republicans who debated in Las Vegas last week should feel confident about their prospects in this pivotal region.

Romney's rise challenges tea party's clout in GOP

On The Radar

Mitt Romney's early success in the Republican presidential race is challenging the tea party's clout. Will it continue to pull the GOP sharply right? Will it slowly fade? Or merge with mainstream Republican elements in a nod to pragmatism, something it's hardly known for?  Read more

Will tea party purists back imperfect Romney?

On The Radar

After watching the GOP presidential debate the other night, it was hard to avoid this conclusion: Mitt Romney looks more and more like the GOP presidential nominee. He's the best debater. He's got his issues and his rejoinders down pat. He brushes away his opponents like lint on his lapel. And all with such ease.

July 29, 2011

Weekly Show

Lawmakers prepare to work through the weekend to reach a debt deal and avoid a U.S. default. What will it take to break the stalemate and how would a default impact Americans? Plus, how Obama, Boehner, and Reid have played it so far. Joining Gwen Ifill: Major Garrett, National Journal; Jeanne Cummings, Bloomberg News; David Wessel, The Wall Street Journal; and Karen Tumulty, The Washington Post.

 

On the Radar: August 17, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

Grand Bargains: Why they are so elusive

Gwen's Take

I’ve been afflicted this week with a disorienting sense of déjà vu that affects any reporter who has covered Washington long enough. Even the most consequential and operatic standoffs begin to seem eerily familiar.