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Ed O'Keefe

Panelist Bios

Ed O’Keefe is a congressional reporter with The Washington Post, having covered the 2008 and 2012 presidential and  congressional elections.

Previously, O’Keefe authored The Post’s Federal Eye blog, which tracks federal agencies, federal employees and government oversight issues. During the 2008 election season, he was one of The Post’s first reporters to travel the campaign trail as a video journalist, blogger and contributor to the newspaper.

Chat With Gwen: June 28, 2012

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Thursday, June 28, 2012

Thanks to everyone who participated in the Thursday, June 28th live chat with Gwen Ifill. Read the transcript below.

Dearth of Civility in the Public Square

Gwen's Take

Flash back with me to sixth grade recess. A bit of taunting that turns into a little shoving and trash talking. Next thing you know, a circle of children are egging each other you on, chanting: “Fight! Fight! Fight!”

What choice did you have but to fight? It wasn’t a very civil thing to do, but this was elementary school.

Now, we live in a world of sixth grade taunting everywhere we look, where disagreements are settled on the playground of dueling campaign appearances and pundit-driven cable television debates.

From the Vault: Remembering David Broder

Vault Show

Remembering Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and long time Washington Week panelist David Broder one year after his passing. Watch a tribute to a dear colleague and friend. Watch the memorial service.

PBS NewsHour: Investigation Finds Members of Congress Steer Millions Close to Home

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A Washington Post investigation found that 33 members of Congress earmarked more than $300 million total for public projects near properties they own while 16 members sent taxpayer money to companies with connections to their close family members. Gwen Ifill and Post reporter Kimberly Kindy discuss the findings and the laws.

Obama Approval Rating Shows Signs of Rebound in Two Polls

On The Radar

President Barack Obama’s approval ratings are showing signs of rebounding following some recent positive economic data and after months of aggressively promoting his jobs plan and criticizing his Republican opposition. Forty-nine percent of Americans approve of how Obama is handling his job, according to an ABC News/Washington Post poll and another conducted for CNN.
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OECD Report Cites Rising Income Inequality

On The Radar

Income inequality is increasing across much of the developed world, a trend that will continue unless governments move aggressively to arrest it, according to a report released Monday by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The widening gap between rich and poor is being driven in part by a growing disparity in wages, as skilled workers command a disproportionate share of the bounty made possible by technological progress, the report said.

Gingrich Emerges as Clear Front-Runner in Iowa

On The Radar

Propelled by his debate performances and the demise of Herman Cain’s candidacy, former House speaker Newt Gingrich sits atop the Republican presidential field in Iowa with a clear lead over his closest competitors, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll. Gingrich, according to the survey, has advantages that extend well beyond the horse race that put him in an enviable position in the final weeks before the state’s Jan. 3 caucuses, which serve as the formal start of the long nominating season.

Payroll tax break: Extension proposals from both parties fail in Senate

On The Radar

The Senate late Thursday rejected competing partisan visions for extending a temporary tax break that benefits virtually every American worker, clearing the way for more serious negotiations over how to cover the cost of the tax cut. All but a handful of Democrats voted in favor of their party’s proposal, but in a surprising turn, more Republicans voted against the GOP plan than in favor of it. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) predicted this week that a majority of his conference would vote for the party’s plan to extend the payroll tax cut.

Supercommittee announces failure in effort to tame debt

On The Radar

A special congressional committee created to try to curb the national debt abandoned its work and conceded failure Monday, the latest setback in a long effort by Washington to overcome ideological differences and stem the rising tide of red ink. In a joint statement issued hours before a midnight deadline, the Democratic and Republican leaders of the panel said that they were “deeply disappointed” by their inability to reach an agreement and that they hope for progress in the months ahead.