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Episodes and Videos

Gwen's NewsHour Reports

How a viral fundraiser earned a cool $220 million for ALS

December 30, 2014
This year, a challenge to Facebook users to douse themselves in ice water became an internet craze, raising millions for ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease. Gwen Ifill talks to Nancy Frates, the mother of the man who inspired the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, about the impetus for the viral fundraising campaign and how it has advanced awareness and research of the disease.
From the Vault

Changing Demographics of Congress

Air Date: 
November 6, 1992
When the new Congress is sworn in next week, for the first time ever it will start the session with more than 100 women. While this is a milestone, the number is only a slight increase from the last Congress. We look back in the Washington Week Vault to post-election 1992 and the demographics of the incoming 103rd Congress. During the so-called "Year of the Woman," Congress saw the largest year-over-year increase in women members ever. The Senate tripled the number of women from two to six. Carol Moseley Braun became the first black woman elected to the Senate, and California became the first state to be represented by two female Senators. The same election saw 19 new Hispanics and African Americans elected. As U.S. News and World Report's Gloria Borger said on Washington Week, Congress had "finally adjusted itself to the demographic realities of our world."
Gwen's NewsHour Reports

Was weather to blame for AirAsia disappearance?

December 30, 2014
Gwen Ifill interviews The Wall Street Journal’s Guarav Raghuvanshi from Singapore about the missing AirAsia jetliner, how monsoon season may factor into the disappearance and if there are similarities to Malaysia Airlines 370.
Webcast Extra

Tying up the Loose Ends of 2014

December 26, 2014
A rapid-fire update on 2014's other big stories.

The Stories That Shaped 2014

December 26, 2014
From good economic news to foreign policy challenges, 2014 was eventful.
Gwen's NewsHour Reports

FDA plans to end prohibition on blood donation by gay men, with conditions

December 24, 2014
The FDA is set to ease a 31-year ban on blood donations by gay men, put in place in the early days of the AIDS crisis. The policy revision will allow gay men to donate blood one year after their last sexual contact, which could free hundreds of thousands of pints a year. I. Glenn Cohen of Harvard Law School joins Gwen Ifill to discuss the change in donor requirements and how the FDA move came about.
Gwen's NewsHour Reports

Some experts question evidence North Korea is behind the Sony hack

December 24, 2014
Some cyber security experts are skeptical of assertions that North Korea is responsible for a massive hack on Sony. To examine the debate, Gwen Ifill gets assessment from Dmitri Alperovitch of CrowdStrike and Marc Rogers of CloudFlare.
Gwen's NewsHour Reports

New York police killings raise questions of cause and effect after weeks of protests

December 23, 2014
The murder of two New York City police officers has ignited a volley of blame and exposes the deep rifts dividing a city in mourning. Gwen Ifill gets two perspectives from Patrick Colligan of the New Jersey State Policemen's Benevolent Association and Mark Levine of the New York City Council.
Backstory

Cuba Looks Forward

December 23, 2014
On December 17, 2014, President Obama announced plans to restore full diplomatic relations with Cuba and to open an embassy in Havana after more than 50 years. NPR National Security Correspondent Tom Gjelten, author of "Bacardi and the Long Fight for Cuba: A Biography of a Cause," looks ahead at the changes facing the island nation. How will the changing relationship with the U.S. affect the political and cultural landscape? And as Raul Castro announces his plans to step down in 2018, who will lead the country into the future?