Essential Reads

Essential Reads is your one-stop source for the top stories of the day as reported by your favorite Washington Week panelists. It's a simple way to save time and stay informed about the news you need to know. Check it out every day!

Apr 29, 2013

  • Obama to Nominate Charlotte Mayor to Transportation Post

    By Peter Baker, The New York Times

    President Obama on Monday plans to nominate Anthony R. Foxx, the mayor of Charlotte, N.C., to be the next secretary of transportation, choosing a rising young African-American from the South to balance out a cabinet criticized for a lack of diversity.

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  • Middle-Class Americans Still Aren't Being Helped by Washington

    By Dan Balz, The Washington Post

    The 2012 presidential campaign was fought over one big issue: which candidate and which party would be better equipped to help and protect struggling middle-class Americans. Since then, political leaders in Washington have done nothing to make good on their promises.

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  • FBI Criticized For Failing To 'Connect Dots' In Boston Case

    With Tom Gjelten, NPR

    The failure of the FBI and the CIA to keep track of Tamerlan Dsarnaev in the months preceding the Boston Marathon bombing has prompted criticism that U.S. law enforcement and intelligence officials ignored important warning signs. The case is reminiscent of criticism leveled at counterterrorism officials after Army Maj. Nidal Hasan's shooting rampage at Fort Hood Texas in November 2009 and after the al-Qaida-directed attempt to blow up a civilian airliner on Christmas Day of that year. In both cases, counterterrorism officials subsequently acknowledged that mistakes had been made. Whether authorities missed important evidence of Dsarnaev's intentions, however, is far less clear. Veteran intelligence officers say resource and legal constraints make it very difficult to follow suspicious individuals closely unless their behavior is genuinely alarming.

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  • Asylum and Entry/Exit Systems Get Another Look in Congress After Boston

    By Fawn Johnson, National Journal

    If the political stars had been aligned differently, the home-made bombs that exploded at the Boston Marathon finish line earlier this month would have derailed the fast-moving immigration effort on Capitol Hill. It is not uncommon for lawmakers to shy away from hard-nosed legislative deal-making on controversial issues in the wake of such unexpected catastrophes.

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  • McManus: Obama's War on Red Tape

    By Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times

    Here are three things the Obama administration has done that you probably didn't know about: Ever struggle with those accordion-style rubber sleeves on nozzles at the gas station? The sleeve — technically a "vapor recovery nozzle" — was required by the Environmental Protection Agency to keep gasoline vapors from leaking into the air. But most cars and trucks now have technology that does the job better, so last year the EPA abolished the nozzle requirement. Because each sleeve-equipped nozzle can cost as much as $300, the change will save gas stations thousands of dollars.

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  • Court May Limit Use of Race in College Admission Decisions

    By Joan Biskupic, Reuters

    Thirty-five years after the Supreme Court set the terms for boosting college admissions of African Americans and other minorities, the court may be about to issue a ruling that could restrict universities' use of race in deciding who is awarded places.

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  • Black Voters Are Key to a Colbert Busch Win in South Carolina

    By Beth Reinhard, National Journal

    South Carolina’s First Congressional District is known for the churning Port of Charleston, growing suburbs to the north, and stately homes with wrap-around porches from Beaufort to Mount Pleasant. The white, well-heeled voters who dominate the district favored Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney by 18 percentage points.

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Apr 26, 2013

  • Doing Nothing in Syria Is Riskier Than Getting Involved

    By James Kitfield

    Should the United States and its allies become directly involved in Syria’s civil war, historians may well look back at Thursday’s announcement that the regime of strongman Bashar al-Assad has used chemical weapons against his own people as an important inflection point. In truth, the Obama administration has already been quietly increasing its assistance to the Syrian rebels for months, as red flags continue to mount indicating that the cost of doing almost nothing about Syria has steadily begun to outweigh the risks of doing more.

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  • White House Says Syria Used Sarin Gas on Its Own People

    With Martha Raddatz, ABC News

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  • Q&A on Assad's WMD Use and the U.S. Response

    By Alexis Simendinger, Real Clear Politics

    The White House confirmed Thursday that Bashar al-Assad’s regime in Syria “used chemical weapons on a small scale” in the civil war there, potentially escalating international resolve to end a violent conflict that has displaced 2 million people and killed 70,000 to 80,000 Syrians.

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  • Bush Library Dedication Both a Look Back and a Prologue

    By Dan Balz, The Washington Post

    All the living presidents came together here Thursday to pay tribute to one of their own, and for one brief moment, George W. Bush’s presidency was free of controversy.

    In office, the nation’s 43rd president lived through eight tumultuous years. But as he and dignitaries from around the world joined to dedicate the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum on the campus of Southern Methodist University, there was no mention of Iraq, no talk of Hurricane Katrina, no reference to the financial collapse that marked his last months in office.

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  • ‘We Stand With You,’ Obama Tells Mourners at Texas Memorial

    By Peter Baker, The New York Times

    A somber President Obama paid tribute on Thursday to firefighters killed in a spectacular explosion that devastated a small Texas town last week, praising their courage and vowing to help their community recover from a “time of unimaginable adversity.”

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  • Special Interests Shadow Immigration Reform

    By Beth Reinhard, National Journal

    The most important spokesman for the immigration-reform bill in the Senate, Florida Republican Marco Rubio, is promoting a “myth-busting” website. No, the legislation will not offer immigrants free phones. No, illegal immigrants will not be eligible for welfare benefits.

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  • Obama Needs To Let Republicans Win Immigration Battle

    By Amy Walter, Cook Political Report

    In the wake of the defeat of gun control legislation, lots of DC-insiders are speculating that immigration reform will meet the same fate. The president doesn't have the juice, they say, to muscle any sort of significant, complex legislation through Congress. That may or may not be true. But, what is clear is that if Obama wants a victory on immigration, he's got to step away from the bully pulpit instead of spending all of his time behind it.

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Apr 25, 2013

  • Bush Library in Dallas Opens with Rare Presidents Club Reunion

    By Michael Duffy and Nancy Gibbs, TIME

    Presidential libraries are the workshops where legacies can be polished and memories can be modified, and so the living members of The Presidents Club take them very seriously. Which is why five presidents will meet for only the second time today at the dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.

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  • Obama’s Delicate Task at Bush Library Event

    By Peter Baker, The New York Times

    President Obama has left little mystery about how he views his predecessor. “The failed policies of George W. Bush” wiped away a budget surplus and “squandered the legacy” of bipartisan foreign policy. Mr. Bush put two wars “on a credit card,” led the country away “from our values” and “crashed the economy.”

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  • What We’ve Learned About George W. Bush Since He Left Town

    By John F. Harris and James Hohmann, Politico

    The one duty we owe to history, said Oscar Wilde, is to rewrite it.

    Four years after leaving office, the history of George W. Bush’s presidency is being rewritten — ever-so-slowly, and not yet in ways that fundamentally challenge popular understandings of the man and his tenure.

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  • Obama Gets Peek at His Future as a Past President

    By Alexis Simendinger, Real Clear Politics

    If anyone needs a reminder about the arc of the modern presidency, tell them to pay attention to the salutes, solace and, yes, the sawbucks reeled in and offered up in two Texas cities during a single 24-hour period this week.

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  • Dems, GOP Talk Up Deficit Reduction, But Don't Act

    By Charles Babington, Associated Press

    Liberals' loud objections to White House proposals for slowing the growth of huge social programs make it clear that neither political party puts a high priority on reducing the deficit, despite much talk to the contrary.

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  • Boehner-Led Cost-Cutting Saving Millions in the House

    By Susan Davis, USA Today

    The House of Representatives will spend 15% less on its own operations this year than it did three years ago under a cost-cutting effort launched by Speaker John Boehner that is on pace to save taxpayers more than $400 million by the end of this year.

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