June 2013

PBS Newshour: In Texas, Marathon Filibuster Derails New State Restrictions on Abortion

A Texas state bill supported by Republican lawmakers to ban abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy and require new standards for abortion providers was derailed by a marathon filibuster led by Fort Worth Democrat Wendy Davis. Gwen Ifill recaps the dramatic night in the Texas State Senate with Evan Smith of The Texas Tribune.

 

PBS Newshour: Obama Moves to Limit Greenhouse Gases Emissions Through Executive Order

President Barack Obama announced a sweeping proposal to curb climate change and cut emissions. Gwen Ifill gets two reactions on the plan and its potential impact from Frances Beinecke, president of the Natural Resources Defense Council and attorney Scott Segal, who represents companies pushing for the Keystone extension.

PBS Newshour: What Does the Supreme Court Decision Mean for Affirmative Action's Future?

The Supreme Court ruled to send a case involving affirmative action at the University of Texas back to a lower court. Gwen Ifill gets debate from Lee Bollinger of Columbia University and Gail Heriot of University of San Diego School of Law on the use of affirmative action in higher education.

 

PBS Newshour: 'Whitey' Bulger Trial Stars Institutional Corruption, 'Criminal With Scruples'

Accused mob boss James 'Whitey' Bulger, 83, finally had his day in court after 16 years on the run. Bulger allegedly ran the violent Winter Hill gang in South Boston. He has pleaded not guilty to charges of extortion, racketeering and 19 murders. Gwen Ifill talks to Kevin Cullen of The Boston Globe, who was in the courtroom.

PBS NewsHour: How Does the Government Manage Workers With Access to Classified Information

Edward Snowden's leak of classified NSA documents bring up concerns about the reliance on contractors within the intelligence community. Gwen Ifill talks to Irving Lachow of Center for a New American Security and Dana Priest of The Washington Post about how the government protects employees' access to sensitive information.

PBS Newshour: What Should Be Up for Public Debate When It Comes to Secret Surveillance?

Did Edward Snowden give Americans vital information about how they're being watched or did he put national security at risk? Gwen Ifill moderates a debate on the public and political oversight of U.S. intelligence with former Democratic congresswoman Jane Harman and James Bamford, author of "The Shadow Factory."

PBS Newshour: Honoring Civil Rights Hero Medgar Evers, Warrior for U.S. on More Than One Front

Nearly half a century since his murder, civil rights activist Medgar Evers was honored in a ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery. Gwen Ifill examines the life and legacy of Evers -- a World War II veteran and the NAACP's first field secretary in the South -- with Jerry Mitchell of The Clarion-Ledger newspaper.

 

PBS Newshour: Top Brass Reject Overhauling Military Justice System to Reduce Sexual Assault

The military's top leaders rejected Senate proposals to remove commanders from their role in adjudicating service personnel who are accused of serious crimes while in uniform. Gwen Ifill gets two views on possible solutions from Eugene Fidell of Yale Law School and retired Maj. Gen. Charles Dunlap of Duke University Law School.

PBS Newshour: High Court Says Police Can Collect DNA From People Arrested for Serious Crimes

In a 5-4 vote, the Supreme Court ruled that police officers can take DNA samples without a warrant from people they arrest for serious crimes without violating the Fourth Amendment. Marcia Coyle of The National Law Journal joins Gwen Ifill to help clarify the details of the ruling and how the justices were split on the decision.