Gwen's PBS NewsHour Reports

Click below to read and watch a selection of Gwen's reports and analysis on the PBS NewsHour.

PBS Newshour: Is Obama’s foreign policy doctrine working?

Thu, 05/01/2014

Little progress on a broad Pacific trade agreement and challenging dynamics in Ukraine and the Mideast peace process have prompted new criticism for President Obama’s foreign policy. Gwen Ifill gets reaction from Nicholas Burns of Harvard University, Trudy Rubin of The Philadelphia Inquirer and retired Col. Andrew Bacevich from Boston University.

PBS Newshour: Supreme Court considers warrantless searches when cellphones hold troves of personal info

Wed, 04/30/2014

The Supreme Court heard arguments in two cases that challenge whether the personal data held on cellphones should be fair game for law enforcement when a suspect is placed under arrest. Gwen Ifill talks to Marcia Coyle of The National Law Journal, who was in the courtroom.

PBS Newshour: U.S. sanctions Putin’s friends and advisors to force ‘clear choice’ on Ukraine

Tue, 04/29/2014

The Obama administration has announced additional sanctions on Russian officials and key companies with close ties to President Putin to persuade Moscow to diffuse tensions in Ukraine. Deputy National Security Advisor Tony Blinken joins Gwen Ifill to discuss the strategy behind these new sanctions, their potential to hurt U.S. companies and the prospect of further sanctions still in reserve.

PBS Newshour: Is the Mideast peace process dead?

Fri, 04/25/2014

The nine-month Mideast peace effort suffered its latest blow when Israel announced its negotiators are walking away from the table after a reconciliation deal between rival Palestinian groups. Gwen Ifill talks to Hussein Ibish of the American Task Force for Palestine and Jeffrey Goldberg of Bloomberg View on the elusive prospects for a peace deal.

PBS Newshour: Consumer groups warn dismantling net neutrality could stymie startup innovation

Fri, 04/25/2014

The Federal Communications Commission is on the brink of changing the longstanding net neutrality principle, which allows consumers unfettered access to web content, and limits the ability of Internet service providers to block or filter material. New guidelines would allow some companies to charge more for faster service. Gwen Ifill talks to Cecilia Kang of The Washington Post about what’s at stake.