Joan Biskupic | Washington Week

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Joan Biskupic

Joan Biskupic has covered the Supreme Court since 1989 and is the author of two judicial biographies: American Original: The Life and Constitution of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2009) and Sandra Day O’Connor: How the First Woman on the Supreme Court Became Its Most Influential Justice (HarperCollins, 2005).

She joined Reuters in February 2012 as Legal Affairs editor-in-charge. She previously was the Supreme Court reporter for USA Today (2000-2012) and The Washington Post (1992-2000) and covered legal affairs for Congressional Quarterly's Weekly Report (1989-1992). She won the Everett McKinley Dirksen award for Distinguished Reporting of Congress for her coverage of the 1991 Clarence Thomas nomination and Senate confirmation hearings.

Biskupic holds a law degree from Georgetown University and is the author of several legal reference books, including Congressional Quarterly’s two- volume encyclopedia on the Supreme Court (3rd Ed., 1997) with co-editor Elder Witt.

She lives in Washington, D.C.,  with her husband and daughter.

Most Recent Appearances

Recent Appearances

Ifill talks media at the College of William and Mary

April 3, 2015
Gwen Ifill, co-anchor and co-managing editor of PBS NewsHour and the College of William and Mary’s 2015 Hunter B. Andrews Distinguished Fellow in American Politics, met with the College community March 30 and 31.

100 Lives & The Armenian Genocide: Gwen Ifill talks to George Clooney & Ruben Vardanyan

March 10, 2015
Gwen Ifill speaks to 100 LIVES founder Ruben Vardanyan and George Clooney at the launch of 100 Lives, a new global initiative around the events of the Armenian Genocide. 100 LIVES hopes to share stories of survivors and the impact on the present and future.

Ford Foundation NetGain Conference: The Internet, Philanthropy and Progress

February 11, 2015
In this panel discussion, foundation leaders Mitchell Baker of Mozilla, Chris Stone of Open Society Foundations, and Darren Walker of the Ford Foundation discuss how foundations can best ensure that technological progress is used a force for social good rather than one of surveillance and inequality.

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