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Gen. John Allen Stands by U.S. Apology for Koran Burning

On The Radar

Gen. John Allen, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, said today he does not regret the apologies he and President Obama issued for the Koran burning incident, arguing that the move -- rare for a U.S. commander in chief -- was the right thing to do and that it had saved American lives.
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PBS NewsHour: Obama, Netanyahu Show Unity, Yet Signal Differences, Over Iran Strategy

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President Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu met Monday at the White House to discuss possible solutions to threats from Iran's nuclear program, pledging unity but signalling tension over how to proceed. Gwen Ifill reports.

Israel's Brinkmanship, America's Peril

On The Radar

Last week, Gen. Norton A. Schwartz, chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force, confirmed a no-longer-surprising fact: the Pentagon has sent the White House a menu of options for going to war with Iran. But that doesn't mean the military thinks bombing Iran would be a good idea. "It's not prudent at this point to decide to attack Iran," Schwartz's boss, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said on CNN last month, adding that his advice applied to Israel as well as the United States.

Koran Burning in Afghanistan Fuels Bloody New Attacks on U.S. Forces

On The Radar

The deaths of a pair of American soldiers in Afghanistan Thursday highlights the bloody intersection of two dangerous aspects of the long war there: the growing Afghan fury over the burning of Korans and the continued killings of Western troops by their Afghan counterparts. An Afghan soldier shot and killed the U.S. soldiers at an outpost in eastern Afghanistan’s Nangarhar Province and then, according to a U.S. official familiar with the matter, fled into the large crowd of demonstrators outside the base.

U.S. Forces Burn Old Copies of the Koran

On The Radar

Officials claim it was a misunderstanding when the holy books were discarded.

PBS NewsHour: Chinese VP Xi Ready for 'Candid' Dialogue on Human Rights

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Amid ongoing tension between China and the United States on a variety of issues from human rights to currency policy, President Obama struck a hopeful note Tuesday as he hosted Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping, who is likely to become the next president of the world's most populous nation. Gwen Ifill reports.
 

Syria Peace Prospects Look Grim as U.S. Closes Embassy

On The Radar

The United States scrambled Monday to salvage an Arab peace initiative aimed at halting Syria's descent into all-out civil war, closing the U.S. Embassy in Damascus and deliberating with European and Arab allies on other measures aimed at forcing President Bashar Assad to surrender power.
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Romney Criticizes Afghan Pullout Plan, but Obama Is Eager for the Debate

On The Radar

It did not take long for Mitt Romney to pounce on Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta’s statement Wednesday that American troops could end their combat role in Afghanistan by mid-2013, 18 months sooner than expected. Within hours, Mr. Romney lambasted it as “naïve” and “misguided.”
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Panetta: U.S. to Wind Down Combat Mission in Afghanistan Next Year

On The Radar

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said that the U.S.-led NATO coalition would end its combat role in Afghanistan next year, the clearest indication yet that the Obama administration is accelerating its plans to wind down the long and unpopular Afghan war. “Hopefully by mid- to the latter part of 2013, we’ll be able to make a transition from a combat role to a training, advise, and assist role,” The Washington Post said Panetta told reporters accompanying him to Brussels.

U.S. Officials Point To Iran As Growing Threat

On The Radar

Iran is moving toward a nuclear capability, but its intentions are unclear. Al-Qaida is weakened but remains dangerous. In Afghanistan, the Taliban are a determined adversary, but it may make sense to negotiate with them.


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