Related Content: Jeff Zeleny

December 30, 2012

Weekly Show

Four days before the Iowa Caucuses, Mitt Romney and Ron Paul lead, but Rick Santorum may surprise come voting day. Plus, how will Congressional retirements affect Democrats' efforts to retain control of the Senate in 2012? Joining Gwen from Iowa: Karen Tumulty, The Washington Post; Jeff Zeleny, The New York Times. Around the table: Christina Bellatoni, CQ Roll Call; Susan Davis, USA Today.

Top Bachmann Aide in Iowa to Support Paul

On The Radar

The top Iowa adviser to Representative Michele Bachmann of Minnesota announced Wednesday night that he was jumping ship to support the candidacy of Representative Ron Paul of Texas. Kent Sorenson, a state legislator who has been at Mrs. Bachmann’s side for months, made his decision in the closing days of the Iowa caucus campaign. It was a significant blow to Mrs. Bachmann, who has struggled to regain the fleeting summertime glory of winning the Iowa straw poll.

Gingrich Condemns Senate on Payroll Tax Vote

On The Radar

Newt Gingrich put a pox on all parties in Washington on Wednesday for failing to pass a payroll tax extension, but he especially condemned the Senate, where Republicans joined Democrats to vote for a two-month extension of the tax break, which affects 160 million Americans. House Republicans under Speaker John A. Boehner rejected that plan.
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Perry Dismisses Gingrich’s Complaint of ‘Negative’ Campaigning

On The Radar

Gov. Rick Perry of Texas said Tuesday that he was not concerned by a complaint from a Republican rival, Newt Gingrich, that the tenor of the presidential primary race had grown too negative and indicated that he had no plans to stop drawing contrasts in the final two weeks before the Iowa caucuses. “As long as no one is misstating the facts, I don’t consider that to be negative,” Mr. Perry said. “It’s always in the eye of the beholder.”

December 16, 2011

Weekly Show

Congress fights the clock to avert a government shutdown. Also, now that the last GOP presidential debate before the Iowa caucus is over, who is the frontrunner? Plus, the war in Iraq officially ends as the U.S. hands over military control to Iraqis. Joining Gwen: Jeanne Cummings, Bloomberg News; Dan Balz, The Washington Post; Jeff Zeleny, The New York Times; Laura Meckler, The Wall Street Journal

 

As Romney Steps Cautiously, Gingrich Duels With Others

On The Radar

The leading Republican presidential candidates largely shelved their contentious attacks on one another to deliver their closing arguments on Thursday night at the final debate before the nominating contests begin, but Newt Gingrich did not escape sharp questions about his record in and out of government and his ability to defeat President Obama.
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In a Tactical Shift, Romney Trains Sights on Gingrich

On The Radar

Mitt Romney, his presidential aspirations suddenly endangered by Newt Gingrich’s rapid resurgence, is employing aggressive new arguments in an effort to disqualify Mr. Gingrich as a credible choice to Republicans, calling him “zany” in an interview on Wednesday and questioning his commitment to free enterprise.
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Race Reshaped, Rivals Target Gingrich in GOP Debate

On The Radar

Newt Gingrich offered a robust defense of his views on the Middle East, his lucrative work after leaving Congress and his conservative credentials during a spirited debate here on Saturday night as his Republican presidential rivals urged voters to take a hard look at his candidacy.

Gingrich Surge Brings Added Scrutiny

On The Radar

A year ago, as Newt Gingrich was beginning to seriously explore whether to seek the Republican presidential nomination, he bristled a bit when asked how his three marriages would be viewed by conservative voters. “We’ll find out,” Mr. Gingrich said in an interview with The New York Times a week before Christmas. “What people want to know is, ‘Are you who you seem to be?’”

Democrats See a Two-Horse G.O.P. Race, Adding a Whip

On The Radar

The White House and its allies are starting to turn their sights to Newt Gingrich, invoking his tumultuous history as House speaker to brand him as the “godfather of gridlock,” a testament to his new viability and the sudden realization that he could be President Obama’s Republican opponent.