Related Content: Doyle McManus

An Election Referendum or a Choice?

Essential Reads

Is November's presidential election a referendum on President Obama's record or a choice between two different approaches to government? How voters answer that question could well determine the outcome.

All pain, No Gain in Southern Europe

Essential Reads

From the American side of the Atlantic, the debate over Europe's economic future often sounds like a bloodless, mind-numbing discussion of currency zones, bank recapitalization and interest rates. But in countries with fragile economies like Spain and Italy, it takes on real-life urgency.

Obama Evolves on Gay Marriage

Essential Reads

President Obama's announcement Wednesday that he was done "evolving" and now supports same-sex marriage was, in retrospect, inevitable. Vice President Joe Biden made it so Sunday, when he remarked almost casually that he had grown "comfortable" with gay marriage. Biden's comfort level made Obama the nation's least comfortable politician, tied up in a knot of convoluted positions that he had hoped voters on both sides would overlook.

Bin Laden and Ballots

Essential Reads

We're far enough away from it now that we can probably all agree: It was a mistake for George W. Bush to land on that aircraft carrier in a flight suit to proclaim "Mission Accomplished." And not just because the war in Iraq was far from over at that point. Every president crows about his successes in war — assuming he has anything to crow about. But he should try to seem modest and statesmanlike while doing so.

April 13, 2012

Weekly Show

With Rick Santorum out of the GOP race, Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama are gearing up for the general election. But recent comments about Romney's wife, Ann, have caused controversy over gender politics. Plus, a look at the fragile ceasefire in Syria. Joining Gwen: Dan Balz, Washington Post; Beth Reinhard, National Journal; John Harris, POLITICO; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times.

 

March 9, 2012

Weekly Show

Mitt Romney won big on Super Tuesday, giving him more than 35% of the delegates needed to clinch the nomination. But Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich, and Ron Paul stay defiant, continuing their campaigns as the race focuses on Mississippi and Alabama next Tuesday. What's next? Joining Gwen: Jeff Zeleny, New York Times; Beth Reinhard, National Journal; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times.

 

From the Vault: Remembering David Broder

Vault Show

Remembering Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and long time Washington Week panelist David Broder one year after his passing. Watch a tribute to a dear colleague and friend. Watch the memorial service.

No Quit in these Presidential Candidates

On The Radar

Poor Mitt Romney. He won six of 10 states on Super Tuesday, including hotly contested Ohio. He lengthened his lead in the count of delegates who will actually choose the Republican presidential nominee. But he's still a long way from claiming victory. Why? Because there's no compelling reason for Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich or Ron Paul to drop out of the race. Each has a reason to keep fighting at least through April — and maybe all the way to the convention in August.

Israel's Brinkmanship, America's Peril

On The Radar

Last week, Gen. Norton A. Schwartz, chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force, confirmed a no-longer-surprising fact: the Pentagon has sent the White House a menu of options for going to war with Iran. But that doesn't mean the military thinks bombing Iran would be a good idea. "It's not prudent at this point to decide to attack Iran," Schwartz's boss, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said on CNN last month, adding that his advice applied to Israel as well as the United States.

Romney Won't Be A Pushover in November

On The Radar

Mitt Romney started as the odds-on favorite for the GOP nomination, and he's never really lost that spot. Still, he's had a rough six weeks. He's been attacked by his Republican rivals as both a heartless capitalist and a closet liberal. He's committed gaffes that make him sound like a caricature of a clueless rich guy. And the Democratic president he wants to replace has surged ahead of him (and all the other GOP challengers) in head-to-head polls.