Related Content: Doyle McManus

February 3, 2012

Weekly Show

What do January’s unemployment numbers tell us about the economy? Plus, Mitt Romney won the Florida primary, but his comments about the poor are making headlines. Also, new FEC disclosures shine light on Super PAC money.

The Gingrich playbook

On The Radar

Newt Gingrich says he's staying in the Republican presidential race all the way to the GOP convention in August, and that he's willing — even eager — to fight for the nomination on the convention floor. But does he have a chance? Gingrich and his aides seem to think so, and they have a theory of how they can wrest the nomination from Mitt Romney.
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A Gingrich Presidency?

On The Radar

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote that if Mitt Romney won the South Carolina primary, the Republican presidential race would be over and he would be the nominee. But Romney didn't win, and that means it's time to consider the unthinkable: What would life under President Gingrich be like? It's an easy question to answer because Gingrich has spent much of his campaign listing all the things he wants to do — not only in his first term or his first 100 days but in his first eight hours.

Is Romney a True Conservative?

On The Radar

For months, Mitt Romney's rivals in the Republican presidential race have hammered him as a closet moderate, especially on third-rail social issues such as abortion and gay marriage. "Mitt Romney: Not conservative," charged one recent and typical television commercial sponsored by supporters of Newt Gingrich.
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Romney's 'Electability' is Key

On The Radar

New Hampshire Republicans are practical people. As I traveled around the state this week, voters who said they supported Mitt Romney in Tuesday's presidential primary consistently offered two reasons for their choice. One was Romney's resume: his experience as both a businessman and a reasonably successful governor of Massachusetts.
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Even Despots Don't Live Forever

On The Radar

It was a bad year for the villains of the world. Three of the biggest bad guys met their ends: Osama bin Laden, killed by U.S. commandos who stormed his villa in Pakistan in May; Moammar Kadafi, killed by Libyan insurgents who captured him (with the help of a NATO airstrike) in October; and Kim Jong Il, the ruler of North Korea, who died Dec. 17, reportedly of a heart attack.
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Oops! That Was the Year that Wasn't

On The Radar

A year ago, soon after the Tunisian uprising, I demonstrated my powers of prediction in a column about the democracy movement in the Arab world. The revolution in Tunisia, I wrote, "arose from local circumstances that don't foretell what will happen anywhere else." Three weeks later, Egypt's Hosni Mubarak fell, and the Arab Spring was in full bloom. This brings me to the subject of today's column: A confession of my year's errors and omissions (along with a mention of one or two things I got right).

December 23, 2011

Weekly Show

This week, we look back at 2011 and forward to 2012. We’ll analyze battles between Congress and the President, the economy, the killing of Osama bin Laden, the pullout of US troops in Iraq while fighting continues in Afghanistan, and more. Joining Gwen: Helene Cooper, New York Times; Michael Duffy, Time Magazine; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times; David Wessel, Wall Street Journal.

A Long Goodbye to Afghanistan

On The Radar

This week, the last convoy of U.S. troops in Iraq drove noisily across the border into Kuwait and shut the gate behind them. The next drawdown comes in Afghanistan, where American forces are scheduled to disengage from most combat by the end of 2014. But the Afghanistan withdrawal won't be anywhere near as final as the one we just saw. U.S. military leaders are working on a new slimmed-down strategy that would keep some American troops in combat against the Taliban for years to come, long after 2014.

Could Rubio Save the GOP Ticket?

On The Radar

Florida's new Republican senator, 40-year-old Marco Rubio, is handsome, personable and smart. He can talk with intelligence and ease about foreign policy, the federal budget and the aspirations of the American people. And he has a Reaganesque gift for sounding reassuring, even when he's arguing for Tea Party positions such as a complete overhaul of Social Security and Medicare.