Related Content: White House

Stock Market is a Wild Card In Fiscal Cliff Talks

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Congress and the White House can significantly soften the initial impact of the "fiscal cliff" even if they fail to reach a compromise by Dec. 31. One thing they cannot control, however, is the financial markets' reaction, which possibly could be a panicky sell-off that triggers economic reversals worldwide.

INFLUENCE GAME: Tax them, not us, groups say

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A big coalition of business groups says there must be give-and-take in the negotiations to avoid the "fiscal cliff" of massive tax increases and spending cuts. But raising tax rates — a White House priority — is out of the question, the group adds.

Fiscal cliff negotiators are facing high hurdles

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It's entirely possible that lawmakers and the White House will reach a deal that staves off an avalanche of tax increases and deep cuts in government programs before a Jan. 1 deadline. To do so, however, they'll have to resolve deep political and fiscal disagreements that have stymied them time after time despite repeated promises to overcome them.

PBS NewsHour: Immigration Fallout: A White House Win?

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President Obama's decision last week to help undocumented youths obtain work visas has rippled through the presidential campaigns. Gwen Ifill and Lisa Lerer of Bloomberg News discuss the political fallout, who the new policy affects and what it means for the Latino vote.

Obama's Economic Predicament

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President Obama has almost no significant new openings to rev the stalling U.S. economy before November -- not with Congress as collaborators, at least. So what can he do? The White House says the president will deliver a speech describing his economic vision this month. Offering a public address is Obama's favored fallback when triggering a new phase of economic attention. The president is still touting his American Jobs Act of 2011, but his spokesman said Monday that Obama will continue to search for “potential new ideas.”

PBS NewsHour: The Decorum, Skullduggery and Rivalries of the Presidents Club

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Time magazine editors Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy explore how current and former American presidents interact with one another in their new book, "The Presidents Club: Inside the World's Most Exclusive Fraternity." The authors spoke with Gwen Ifill about cross-party mentoring and the infighting that can occur.

Gamesmanship Abounds as Obama, Romney Campaigns Duel over Jobs

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The campaigns of President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney took their political gamesmanship up a notch on Thursday, with dueling events that featured raucous heckling, a secret trip for reporters and symbolic backdrops that reflected the increasing intensity of the tight race for the White House.

Portrait Unveiling Reunites Bushes and Obamas

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"What would George do?" became a White House laugh line Thursday as three presidents gathered in the East Room for what President George W. Bush jovially described as his "hanging." The official unveiling ceremony for the portraits of the 43rd president and first lady Laura Bush included warm appreciations for peaceful transfers of power after hard-fought elections, the solemn responsibilities of the presidency, and the shared honor of occupying the “people’s house.”

Medal of Freedom Honorees: An Election Year Medley

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Bob Dylan wore formal attire Tuesday while accepting the Presidential Medal of Freedom along with nearly a dozen other recipients. His business suit, roomy for his slight frame, was coal black and decorated with Western-style buckles on the chest pockets. The 71-year-old wore a crisp white shirt and a bow tie. But what captured President Obama's attention and that of a VIP audience packing the East Room of the White House were the aviator sunglasses Dylan wore indoors. Impenetrable.

The Backstory: Traveling with the President

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What's it like to be a reporter covering a president who's also running for re-election? Gwen Ifill gets the "Backstory" from Peter Baker of The New York Times who explains what it's like traveling on on Air Force One with President Obama, the time pressures and fine line between official duties and campaigning.